Tiger Task Force Report

Junior Tiger Task Force

Posted by Susan Sharma on April 23, 2006

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I recently went to the Sriram School in Gurgaon where a screening of "Curbing the Crisis" by Tiger Watch was held. What came as a pleasant surprise was hearing that the "Junior Tiger Task Force" as the young tiger activists in the school call themselves, have got into the act to do something at grassroot level.

They are helping a Mogia family to find an alternate way of earning income. The Mogias are a tribe from Ranthambore who have hunted wild animals for a living for centuries. They also have a "Guggle Project"-helping planting local trees in rehabilitated villages.

Tiger Task Force Report

National Tiger Conservation Authority

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 18, 2005

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The Cabinet on 16/12/05 approved the constitution of a National Tiger Conservation Authority.

Contrary to rising hopes and expectations that the Prime Minister will head the Tiger Conservation Authority, it is the Environment Minister who will head the authority.

The Authority will get statutory and administrative powers to implement the recommendations of the Tiger Task Force.

Tiger Task Force Report

IWC Chat

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 18, 2005

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The topic for our monthly chat on 18December 2005 was "Tiger Task Force Report".

You can read the chat transcript at the following link

http://www.indianwildlifeclub.com/mainsite/ChatTranscript.asp

Those of you who missed the chat, are welcome to write your comments in this blog.

Tiger Task Force Report

Read the report!

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 18, 2005

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The Tiger Task Force has submitted its report. The report brings out some glaring facts. Read the report at this link

http://projecttiger.nic.in/TTF2005/contents.htm

"In the last 30 years, only 80-odd villages have been relocated from all 28 reserves. There are another 1,500 existing inside, of which 250 are within core areas of tiger reserves, which must be relocated. Relocating them will cost Rs 660 crore at the minimum, in terms of the meager relocation package government works with today, and without accounting for land costs. If this is taken into account, then the estimated cost is Rs 11,000 crore. "

What is suggested is a time-bound programme to identify those villages that must be relocated because  they are located inside crucial tiger habitats. It is also suggested that, unlike the past, this relocation must be done speedily and sensitively, "with careful consideration of the needs of people."

The chair person also says that if we do not make peace with the communities who share the tigers’ home, we will lose the war of conservation tiger by tiger.

Identifying the cause for a crisis situation is certainly the first step towards a solution. Let us think solutions now! How can we have the communities become stakeholders in tourism for example? Any suggestions?

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