Nature Heals

Saving Greens for our very Survival

Posted by Shashi Kant Sharma on January 24, 2013

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It is'nt just about sustainable living.
Saving Greens is necessary for our very survival - be it the essential for species survival bio-diversity, the 'basic' water of life, life-regenerating climate (weather cycles) or the beautyof nature which heals minds and brings smiles to the most harried amongst us. Every little bit that any one does will help
Good News is that some Institutions are working to make a difference
The National Green Tribunal (NGT) have added their weight to save the Aravalis in and around Gurgaon-Faribadabad belt.
As reported in the Times of India of January 25, 2013, NGT have passed an order prohibiting non-Forest Activity in three villages in the Gurgaon-Faridabad belt. These are Kot, Mangar, Roz-ka-Gujjar and Sikandarpur (of Marble Market and Wine shops fame)
Some of us have been agitated about the Aravalis being sold off to developers by fobbing off the transaction as a step for developing tourism...........This was a move for destroying the Mangar Forests - a 500 acre grove of the Dhau Tree held sacred by the locals. The effort of the people there is comparable with the Chipko movement of yore in Uttrakhand. A group of 5-6 residents of Mangar Bani literally moved mountains to create awareness about their forest and what that sylvan surrounding was doing to sustain the Gurgaon-Faridabad belt By the way the sale of Forest land was happening in the garb of 'consolidation of land' (misuse of that policy was reported when the Haryana IAS Officedr Khemka was in the news)
For details on the struggle for saving Mangar Bani and Photographs of this Forest visit http://www.indianwildlifeclub.blogspot.in/2012/07/mangarbani-sacred-grove.html

Nature Heals

Nature stimulates

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 04, 2011

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For stressed-out families, spending more time in the natural world — a nature stimulus package — may be just what the doctor and the economist ordered. Here are a few of the benefits:

1. With gas prices on the rise, families are rediscovering both the joy and the cost-effectiveness of getaways in nearby nature, including regional, state or national parks. As Outside magazine puts it, "near is the new far."

2. Unless we're talking about a new bass boat or a high-tech tent, nature toys are free or cheap, and they encourage self-directed creativity. In 2008, the National Toy Hall of Fame in Rochester, N.Y., inducted the stick, which it called not only possibly the oldest toy, but "possibly the best."

3. Green exercise is free. In the United Kingdom, and now in the United States, families are eschewing commercial indoor gyms. Groups of families form " green gyms" and meet once or twice a week to hike, garden or take some other type of exercise in the natural world.

Read more at
http://richardlouv.com/blog/

Nature Heals

Bhatti Mine Sanctuary-The tale of a new forest

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 22, 2011

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Bhatti Mine Sanctuary-The tale of a new forest
" ....Twenty years ago, Bhatti, located on the south-eastern part of the southern ridge of the Aravali range .. was a ruin that had been plundered for its red silica and sandstone.  in 1991, fearing further loss of green cover, the Delhi state government, with the help of a Supreme court order, stopped mining in the area. .....A new threat cropped up last year when the Municipal Corporation of Delhi said it wanted to use Bhatti Mines as a landfill site, a move scotched by the courts.

Read more

http://epaper.livemint.com/ArticleImage.aspx?article=22_08_2011_024_002&mode=1

Nature Heals

Nature in hospitals

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 18, 2007

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Incorporating Nature in Hospitals

Hospitals still need to bring nature into the clinical setting. But there are a few trailblazing institutions as well as people like Becky Pape, CEO of Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital in Oregon, who have become believers.

Indeed, only a curving bank of ceiling-to-floor glass separates patients undergoing chemotherapy at Samaritan Lebanon’s Emenhiser Center from a 11,250 square-foot Japanese garden. Designed by an award-winning father-and-son team, Hoichi and Koichi Kurisu of Kurisu International, the garden boasts three gentle waterfalls and mature black pines.

“We now know that exposure to nature is not just a nice thing—it’s essential,” says Pape. “We’ll never build anything the way we did it before when it was all about technology. I’ve been completely converted. Before the garden, I would have bought a CT scanner or the equivalent with a large sum of money, but now I think we have to marry the technology with an improved environment for patients and staff.”

Source:  http://www.emagazine.com/view/?3863

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