Man Animal Conflict

Human elephant conflict

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 20, 2007

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The Ugly Result Of Human-Wildlife Conflict

Assam_poisoning0028_2© IFAW/WTI

Elephants that migrate through human populated areas of India are bound to enter into conflict with farmers and other land owners. Considering there is no "safe haven" or isolated area in all of India that is free of human habituation, elephant and human conflict in inevitable. Living in such close proximity to each other has resulted in hundreds of animals falling into man-made ditches ("traps") and has caused others to be hit by cars. 

The image shown here displays the ugly and cruel side of this conflict. The poisoning of migrating herds is a common tool used to rid of them completely. The elephant here is a victim of poisoning who also had a message carved into the side of it’s hide that reads: "Paddy thief, elephant Laden". The culprit of this poisoning is equating these endangered animals with terrorists.

 Source: http://www.animalrescueblog.org/2007/12/ifaw-elephants.html


Man Animal Conflict

Indian National Snakebite Protocol

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 15, 2007

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Indian National Snakebite Protocol

India has now become the first country to formally approve a National Snakebite Protocol. This 
includes both treatment and first aid.
In addition, the Government committed to nationwide training for each
State and a comprehensive programme of research with the Indian Council
for Medical Research. This will address many of the unanswered
questions on snakebite management and identify the ever growing list of
medically significant snakes in India.
The notion of ’the Big 4’ was abandoned as being inaccurate and dated. More medically significant snakes are emerging which has serious 
implications for the supply of effective anti venoms.
A significant amount of training has already taken place in 6 States
and more will follow. India has now taken major steps to remove itself from the top of the mortality list where snakebite is concerned.
Wild Goa Yahoo group  Posting by  ian.d.simpson@tinyworld.co.uk 

Man Animal Conflict

Man-Elephant Conflict

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 12, 2006

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Jason Antony and Ankur Chaturvedi:

I found this extremely interesting article on the website of Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun. Here is an excerpt

---"For example, elephants use their powerful infrasonic calls in long distance communication, which can be monitored from a long distance using infrasonic recorder. Earlier studies reveal that the elephants strongly respond to their conspecific calls playback even up to 7 km. distance. Till now, surveys of forest elephants have been based on systematic counts of dung. Cornell Laboratory of Bioacoustics, USA, is developing a new technique known as ‘acoustical monitoring system for elephants’ census.Long distance acoustical monitoring of the elephants not only useful in population estimation but also be used to alert the peoples living on the edges of forests, regarding the movements of elephants."

The full article by Ani Kumar, discussing sounds made by birds and other mammals is available at the link below

http://www.wii.gov.in/publications/newsletter/annual2002/article11.htm


Man Animal Conflict

Man Elephant conflict RE:

Posted by Jason Anthony Fisher on May 02, 2006

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Has anyone one heard of the research in Africa on the recording of Elephant sounds and using those as means (Albeit Still experimental) to 'trick' elephants to avoinding areas? For example, they have learned the sounds( not audible for human ears) with technology to 'warn Lions are approaching'. The elephants go into a defensive mode and avoid areas with that warning call. It's amazing. Surely, this could be done with Asian Elephants. Couldn't it? Just a thought. What if there were a recorded 'Tiger or Leopard approaching call' used?

Jason Fisher (Las Vegas, USA)


Man Animal Conflict

Man - Elephant conflict.

Posted by Raghavendra Rao on April 21, 2006

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Mr. Ankur Chaturvedi seems to have a good way of keeping elephants at bay from straying into plantations or any other human settlement.

True, like he says we are in the way of the elephants and not the other way. 

I would like to know what method Mr. Chaturvedi has in mind to keep elephants from harms way.  May be, if has to be discussed with a lot of like minded people and if found very appropriate, urge the Govt. authorities to implement the same.  We can campaign for such causes from the IWC platform itself, with all the subscribers and members making an e-mail campain to implement the idea.  There is a lot we can do, we only have the first few steps.

Man Animal Conflict

Man-Elephant Conflict

Posted by Susan Sharma on July 02, 2005

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Ankur had sent an email to us seeking help to implement his ideas. We thought throwing open the subject in our open blog forum will bring in some valuable comments.

You can also contact Ankur at his email id damdim.estate@sify.com.

Man Animal Conflict

Man Elephant Conflict

Posted by Ankur Chaturvedi on July 02, 2005

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Hi!

I am an Executive with a multi national Tea Company posted in the plantations. My estate is at the forefrunt of Man-Elephant conflict. Wild heards regularly stray into human habitation causing damage to life and property. The local popyulation and even the forest department resort to very cruel means to drive away the elephants.

I believe that this problem is related to the enfringment of humans into the habitat of elephants and not the oter way round.

I have devised methods to control the wild heards and even loners without cousing any harm to the animals. Unfortunately I am not getting a positive response from either the Authorities or the local population to test and implement my proposals.

I shall be obliged for your assistance in the subject.

Regards
Ankur Chaturvedi
Sr Assistant Manager
Tata Tea Ltd.
Dam Dim Tea Estate
PO- Dam Dim Jalpaiguri
WB- 735209
Phone- 03562-221305(O) 03562-221294(R) +919434184843(MOB)

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