Bio-Diversity

whale sharks

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 29, 2011

Blog

Now, armed with latest technology and collaborations with whale shark experts from around the world, WTI with TCL’s support, is assisting the Gujarat Forest Department, to unravel the mysteries surrounding this fish.

“There must be something in the water of Gujarat that attracts them here,” says Manoj Matwal, Field Officer, WTI. “Perhaps it is the productivity which allows for flourishing of micro-organisms that predominantly make up the diet of this fish.”

Read more at the link

http://www.wti.org.in/current-news/110819_why_do_whale_sharks_visit_gujarat.html

Engineers and Environment

Novel waste water treatment technology from IIT Bombay- Soil Bio technology

Posted by Siddharth Biyani on September 29, 2011

Blog

CAMUS‐SBT  is an  oxygenation  engine that outperforms  conventional  technologies

likeActivated Sludge Process (ASP), Sequential Batch  Reactor (SBR),  Membrane  Bio Reactor

(MBR)and Moving Bed Bio‐reactor (MBBR). Our technology harnesses a  special set  of

 bio‐chemical reactions  to deliver  the  oxygenation required for effluent treatment. 

 

In  conventional technologies,  aeration isachieved mechanically, which is very energy

intensive.  At higher ambient  temperatures (like inIndia) the solubility of oxygen in water

is  low, therefore  energy  requirements of mechanical  aeration  used by  conventional

technologyincreases.  Moreover, air contains only20% oxygen, the rest being nitrogen that

ispassed into water wastefully, further adding to process inefficiency.

 

CAMUS‐SBTresolves this problem  using a  bio‐chemical method  of  oxygenation, which

notonly uses the atmospheric oxygen, but also uses the  nitrogen  from the  atmosphere  in  a

specially  engineered natural  ecology  to achieve the desired level of purity.

 

In  addition conventional  technologiesgenerate  large  amount of  sludge  for which

additional  disposal facilities  have  to  becreated.  CAMUS‐SBT  does not  face  any such

problems.Theschematic of the process is shown below.  


Featuresof our technology:

 

  • ·         Low‐energy consumption

  • ·         All green natural process

  • ·         No moving  parts  apart from pumps

  • ·        No bio‐sludgeformation

  • ·         Efficient removal  of  COD and nitrogen

  • ·         Near drinking  water  quality after treatment

  • ·        Treatment  cost Rs  3‐5  per 1000L

  • ·        Garden likeambiance

  • ·         Bio‐tower designs  available for spaceconstrained areas.

  • ·        One time mediainstallation

  • ·         Long life

  • ·         Unskilled personnel  sufficient to operate

  • ·        No foul Odor

 

Varioususes of the technology

·        Sewage treatment plant(STP)  and industrial effluent treatment plant (ETP)applications.

·        Retrofit ofpre-existing STP/ETPs with SBT/CAMUS-SBT systems. 

·        Laundry EffluentTreatment for total water reuse. 

·        Distilleryspent-wash treatment. 

·        Coffee Effluenttreatment.

·        Hospitals waste water ,Hotels waste water,Municipal waste water can all be treated using SBT.

·        Design of zerodischarge air scrubbers for removal of waste noxious gases (Sulphur, NOx  

              and organic pollutants from Industrialprocesses). 

 

 

Common Mancan help

Currentlyaverage consumption of an individual per day is around 135 Liters per day (mayvary with climatic conditions) and it is increasing with the increasingstandards of living and to add to it our fresh water source are continuouslydepleting. Out of this 135 liters around 50% is being used for secondarypurposes like toilet flushing and bathing etc. which can easily be treated andrecycled which will save a lot of fresh water It’s high time now that we throwour water in the municipal sewer lines and depend on the government to takecare of it which is extremely difficult. The better approach can be to treatthe water locally at our housing complex or bungalows or your commercialcomplexes and reuse it for secondary purposes which doesn’t really requirefresh water sources .The recycled water can be used for gardening and flushingby providing a separate lines but people have a mental block for using therecycled water.

 

To Take aninitiative to recycle waste water in there facilities one has to do following

1.)   Assess the water consumption which can be doneby the total number of residents and multiplying by average water consumption.

2.)   Decide an area for the STP. Preferably itshould be an open area but not accessible to children

3.)   IF you wish to install SBT units the pleasemail us at vec@visionearthcare.com with theabove details .

4.)   It generally takes 2-3 months for a new SBTunit to be installed and get functional.

5.)   If you already have an STP working and if youwant to retrofit it then also please mail us and we will retrofit your existingplant using SBT

6.)   Typically SBT unit require 1-1.5 m2 per KLD(can be included under garden area and design is flexible)of sewage to treat withan operating cost of 3-4 Rs. Per KL

7.)   Various designs are available for spaceconstraint area and for hilly regions where laying of sewerage pipelines isdifficult.


Corporates and Environment

Carbon stocks in vegetation

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 26, 2011

Blog
The Global Conservation Standard is based on a holistic approach on land use in the context of local development. The Conservation Credit Units are quantified on the basis of carbon stocks in vegetation. They are the starting point for bringing in capacity and technology from a wide array of choices, such as agroforestry, intensified food production, land reclamation and erosion control, the production of agro-fuels, composting, watershed protection and wastewater treatment, or eco-tourism. The aim is to empower the rural sector and to substantially reduce the existing pressure on the land and water resources.

Read more at
http://www.conservationstandard.org/home.aspx

Wildlife

African crusader for nature and wildlife

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 26, 2011

Blog
For Wangari Maathai, the preservation of the land and the planting of trees was more than about enriching the lives of people, it was about bringing back animals to deprived ecosystems. Wangari Maathai has been instrumental in bringing an ethic of concern about animals to the attention of the Kenyan parliament and people.

"To speak about Wangari Maathai in Kenya is to speak about the Green Belt Movement (GBM) and environmental conservation. She is the most known environmental conservation activist in Kenya and Africa. Her words get the attention of the who-is-who in global business, politics or funding circles.

Without her, we wouldn’t be seeing or relaxing at Uhuru Park. She was Moi regime’s nightmare – opposing all kinds of attempts to excise government land such as Karura and Ngong forests. Maathai has walked the talk, like the evangelist of the gone days."

Visit the link http://greenbeltmovement.org/index.php  to understand more about the green belt movement in Kenya.

Wildlife

MY DEAR ANIMALS

Posted by sarath lal k.p on September 18, 2011

Blog
I LOVE ANIMALS VERY MUCH .BACAUSE THE ARE VERY CUTE AND BEAUTIFUL. BUT TODAY MOST OF THEM  IS DESTROYED  AND KILLED BY HUMANS.SO I WOULD LIKE TO  CARE THE ANIMALS AND SAVE MY NATURE "" EARTH IS OUR  GOD '''''@EARTH GIVE US EVERY THING & WE  DESTROYED HER EVERY THING '''' SAVE OUR ''''MATHA''''
 

Environment Awareness

Gaia's Garden - A Tribute to the Beauty We Have Lost

Posted by Chinmaya Dunster on September 07, 2011

Blog
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkcP3YsSEr4
Using paintings of vanished species and my own music I hope I can touch a few hearts to care for the threatened beauty around us.

Environment Awareness

Kids and environment

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 06, 2011

Blog

Why Is America's Youth Staying Indoors?

•80 percent said it was uncomfortable to be outdoors due to things like bugs and heat
•62 percent said they did not have transportation to natural areas, and
•61 percent said there were not natural areas near their homes.

Read an interesting article at the link

http://www.nature.org/newsfeatures/kids-in-nature/kids-in-nature-poll.xml?src=gp

Environment Awareness

Wetlands not wastelands

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 02, 2011

Blog
........."This is where policy gets practice fundamentally and fatally wrong. This is not useless wasteland as the revenue office described it when it gave it to the thermal power company at a pittance. This is highly productive land, both in terms of its ecological functions and economic uses. But we cannot see it or won’t because it is not in our interest.

Just consider. This dead swamp is a living sponge, which soaks water, reducing the intensity of floods; the delicately maintained freshwater balance reduces the advance of salinity, which would infiltrate groundwater and ruin drinking water sources. This is a living ecosystem. It plays critical life functions...................
 
-Sunita Narain
Read more at the link http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/lessons-kakarapalli


Bio-Diversity

Vultures in our eco system

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 29, 2011

Blog

Vultures in our eco system
"They process certain bacteria and fungi present in carcasses, which otherwise form spores when brought in contact with a healthy human or animal, and become almost immortal.  In the absence of vultures, dogs end up eating the dead animals and the bacteria spreads thereafter. " Dr. Vibhu Prakash

Here is a link to a comprehensive article on vultures in our eco system, which makes for fascinating reading

The title is "India's Vanishing Vultures" written by Meera Subramanian in the Virginia Quarterly Review

http://www.vqronline.org/articles/2011/spring/subramanian-vultures/

Environment Awareness

Sounds in a National Park

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 24, 2011

Blog


Sounds in a National park

............The impact of noise on wildlife ranging from birds to whales to elk has been a growing focus of scientific study. Increasing evidence suggests that animals in natural settings modify their behavior, though sometimes only briefly, in response to human commotion..........

One of the first things that a visitor to Muir Woods National Monument sees is a monitor that measures sound levels.....

Once the diesel engines had been stilled, visitors began falling into line, heeding a subtle signal that human noises are superfluous here.

But some of the signals are hardly subtle: signs posted near Cathedral Grove in the heart of the park call for silence. Near the entrance to the food and gift shop close to the park’s entrance, a decibel meter measures the sound of a visitor’s voice.

Read more at the link   http://tinyurl.com/3h4qn2o


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/22/science/earth/22sound.html?_r=1&ref=nationalparkservice




Copyright © 2001 - 2017 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use