nature/wildlife films

Living With the Park

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 11, 2006

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ9QxZ7hS5U

Comments on 'YouTube'

Question by Gertalian  :  Did you film this yourself?Also,are the Tigers victims of poaching,or pollution?What has caused their demise? Sorry if my questions seem stupid.

Susan: I filmed "Living With the Park" myself. The tigers are victims of poaching. The single one reason for their numbers reducing is poaching. Habitat reduction, of course, limits the popoulation from increasing. 

Comment by Gertalian :

 To answer your question"Is it time to include the villagers to help protect the Tiger?",I would say yes.Granted I am largely uninformed about the situation,but sometimes desperate circumstances call for desperate measures.

Wildlife

Do we harm nature unconsciously?

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 11, 2006

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How do everyday human activities (seemingly innocuous, though) harm an already threatened species of plants/animals? I mean, do we end up harming nature even unconsciously? ( Question: Shirley Abraham)

We are all part of nature. Being paranoid about hurting nature will not be a good idea. "There is enough in nature to fulfil man's need but not greed." So the first step is to know more about nature and wild animals around us. For people in Orissa it could be Olive Ridley Turtles, for people from Assam -the Hoolock Gibbon, for Rajasthan the Great Indian Bustard and so on. So we all can be part of efforts made to protect these endangered species.

Wildlife

Threats to endangered species

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 10, 2006

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The major threat to endangered species is man's insensitiveness to the fragile web of living things. Blaming deforestation, poaching, wildlife trade etc is addressing the issue in bits and parts. For example, the temptation to cut down forests for agriculture or land grabbing will persist as long as man is conscious of the immediate wealth prospects of land and not the value of a forest for the present and future generations.

Poaching will never stop as long as the market demands and pays for it.

 Endangered species are on their way to being extinct unless we take steps to consciously protect them. Natural extinctions also occur but speeding up the extinction process by manmade causes can be disastrous simply because man does not have the know how to create the web of life.

 Resurrecting the cheetah through DNA will not bring back the cheetah into the web of life. It will probably remain in a zoo for ever.

Environment Awareness

environsciences.com

Posted by gagan matta on June 07, 2006

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http://www.environsciences.com

 This site contains useful information about environment/nature studies and have the details of every topic of our school & college study.

Film Reviews- Wildlife, Nature and Environment

Sarang The Peacock

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 06, 2006

Blog

From: welldunn77 To: "Susan Sharma"

Subject: Lovely Peacock one, Susan

Sent: Sunday, May 28, 2006 9:57 PM

Hi, Susan, the peacock video was lovely, tried to post comment at youtube, but cannot log in, for some funny reason, so doing it here...will 'fix' that later, very busy. Have a great week,

sincerely

Penny Lynn aka Penelope

Wildlife

India's own 'Diane Fossey'

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 05, 2006

Blog

She spent most of her short life working on turtles and there is a small memorial to her right next to the turtle pond at the Madras Crocodile Bank.

Viji (as Vijaya was called) was India’s first woman herpetologist when such a career was unknown in this country. In 2006, 19 years later, her name was formally given to the cane turtle that she spent so much of her time studying. Herpetologists analysed the DNA of Reiner’s now-dead turtles and recently re-named the turtle Vijayachelys silvatica in her honour.

Read more about this remarkable woman who made a difference to wildlife at the following link

http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/sanctmagazine/archivedetail.php?id=775

 

Interlinking of Rivers

Brahmaputra-Ganga Link

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 05, 2006

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Subansiri, a tributary of Brahmaputra

Lower Subansiri (LS) Hydel Project is planned on the river Subansiri, one of the main tributaries of the mighty Brahmaputra. The LS dam is the first project by NHPC (National Hydropower Corporation) in a three-stage cascade plan, Upper Subansiri and Middle Subansiri being the other two. 

The project is on the Assam-Arunachal Pradesh border in one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. The project proposes to use around 4,000 hectares (ha.) of forestland, out of which 3,436 ha. will be submerged, largely in Arunachal Pradesh, by the 116 m dam.

  • Subansiri and Dulung RFs have been listed by the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) as Important Bird Areas (IBAs).
  • There is also an elephant-corridor immediately downstream of the dam site.
  • The Subansiri is one of the most crucial rivers in India for the long-term conservation of the golden mahseer.

Tipaimukh, Brahmaputra

NEEPCO,( North Eastern Electric Power Corp)  is building a 6000 cr project Tipaimukh dam again on the Brahmaputra. Tipaimukh Dam Project at the Manipur-Mizoram border  envisages construction of a 162-meter high dam.

India and Bangladesh share 54 common rivers' waters.   Tipaimukh is a power generating venture.

It  is interesting to note here a similarity in the protest against the proposed Tipaimukh High Dam both in Bangladesh and in Manipur.

  • The Bangladesh people are saying that diversion of water from the Brahmaputra river to the Ganges will definitely dry up the water in the downstream areas, thus seriously affecting agricultural lands in northern parts of the country during the lean season.
  • In Manipur, the protest is about losing several hundred hectares of irreplacable agricultural lands located along the river basin of the Barak, Irang, Makru and Tuivai rivers as a result of submergence of the lands once the Dam is commissioned.

For a f report on other projects on Brahmaputra go to

http://wrmin.nic.in/cooperation/brahmaputra.htm

Engineers and Environment

Grey water recycling in Mathematical Institute

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 03, 2006

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The Chennai Mathematical Institute, spread across five acres in Siruseri, proposes to implement a grey water recycling system in its premises.

The project, in its first phase, would be designed to treat about 2,000 litres of used water. Grey water refers to waste water produced after cleaning, washing and bathing. The treated water could be used for gardening or ground water recharge.

Grey water is easier to treat than black water or water from toilets. This is because black water is loaded with pathogens that are difficult to get rid of through a simple treatment system. Sultan Ahmed Ismail, Managing Director of Ecoscience Research Foundation, who designed the project for the Chennai Mathematical Institute, said that root zone treatment would be used to treat the grey water.

The principle behind the system is quite simple. Grey water is allowed to flow through a horizontal filter that is three metres long, two metres wide and 30 centrimetres deep. The water is passed through a filter of pebbles and gravel. The water also passes through a reed bed, which is slightly sloped so that the water flows easily.

Root zone treatment The reed bed is crucial to the water treatment. The best plants to use for the reed bed include Canna (kal vaazhai), Banana and Colocasia (a yam). The plants keep the soil partially aerobic by pumping atmospheric oxygen to the roots, where some micro organisms live. These bacteria help in the break down on any suspended solids in the grey water.

Once the first phase of the project is fully operational, Mr. Ismail also proposes to treat black water through a more elaborate technology. A composting shed for solid waste management is also being planned.

Chennai Mathematical Institute is an autonomous institution for teaching and research in Mathematical Sciences. It is supported by the Department of Atomic Energy.

SOURCE : The Hindu, Monday, May 22, 2006

Climate change and Global Warming

Major challenge facing the World

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 02, 2006

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"I think climate change is the major challenge facing the world. I have waited until the proof was conclusive that it was humanity changing the climate.

The thing that really convinced me was the graphs connecting the increase of carbon dioxide in the environment and the rise in temperature, with the growth of human population and industrialisation. The coincidence of the curves made it perfectly clear we have left the period of natural climatic oscillation behind and have begun on a steep curve, in terms of temperature rise, beyond anything in terms of increases that we have seen over many thousands of years."

David Attenborough

Excerpts from an interview published on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 by the Independent/UK http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article570935.ece

 

Engineers and Environment

" Fledge" The GREEN CAR

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 01, 2006

Blog

Seven mechanical engineering students of the Delhi College of Engineering (DCE) put together the prototype of the country's first gasoline-electric hybrid car. Named "The Fledge".  The DCE hybrid car participated in the annual green car festival organised by the North-East Sustainable Energy Association of the United States in May 2006.

The model was worked on by a team of sixth semester students -- Abhinav Bhatia, Abhinav Duggal, Abhishek Agarwal, Anubhav Jain, Ashish Dudani, Nitesh Gupta and Siddharth Arora.

"Necessity is the mother of all inventions and the mounting burden of petroleum prices on the common man had kindled a spark in the DCE students to unearth this new technology with a revolutionary drive train," said Abhishek Agarwal, the leader of the seven-member team.

 A 200-Ah lead acid battery with a 1.3 litre fuel tank will provide the energy storage system. Power transmission in the car occurs on the engine as well as the motor mode providing the user with the option of switching to either mode at any point of their journey. A powerful 18 BHP, 346 cc engine along with a 3.5HP, 3000 rpm permanent magnet DC motor serves the very purpose.

Made with the support of the Central Department of Science and Technology and Mahindra and Mahindra, `The Fledge' a one person hybrid vehicle competed with 55 other participants at the "TourDeSol" competition. With a goal of reducing oil use and climate change emissions, the 2006 Tour de Sol, America’s #1 green car show and competition driving toward zero carbon emissions, showcased a variety of cutting-edge technologies that address the energy and climate change crises, offering both short-term and long-term solutions including some that are available on the market today.

"The current hybrids available in this world are very expensive as compared to normal cars, so we have tried to reduce the cost and we have tried to think of simple systems by not using the complicated systems," says Anubhav Jain, adding, " We are making a vehicle for the common person in India who commutes to his office, which is in the range of about 30 kilometers. So ... he has the option [with a vehicle like ours] for electric mode, which has more range." He says it would cost about $10,000 to go into production with Fledge.

The top honors in the competition went to West Philadelphia High School and St. Mark’s School, Southborough, MA. However, the entry from India was commented upon as

"This vehicle was designed to address the transportation needs of millions of people in India that presently use highly polluting motorcycles by presenting them with a practical, very efficient hybrid option." says the TordeSol communication.

 




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