community reserves

Community Reserves and law

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 11, 2005

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There are traditional practices such as sacred tanks and sacred groves, institutions such as Van Panchayats as well as new initiatives such as joint forest management (JFM).

A lot of community based conservation happens on Government lands such as reserve forests, wetlands, and coasts. A good example is the efforts of villagers in Alwar district in protecting the catchment forests of Arvari river, most of which are on Government land.

Once this area is declared as a Conservation Reserve, several Government Agencies will take over the conservation work. A government –people participation approach rather than amending laws and coining new terms seems to be the need of the hour.

E-Governance for Conservation

People issues are complex

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 10, 2005

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At a generic level I agree that Environment issues are very simple. It is people and natural resources at the basic level. People and animals competing for the same natural resources in the case of forests in India. The vision in my paper is to create jobs for the people away from livelihood options utilising the natural resources; but help them become small entrepreneurs by encouraging them to protect/show off the natural resources. The work you have done for Canadian Environment Agency sounds interesting. Was the purpose of this project to protect/assess the environmental impact on an ongoing basis?

E-Governance for Conservation

Why make it complex?

Posted by Amin Adatia on November 10, 2005

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Dr Susan Sharma I read your paper. You make the process sound very complex. I think the solution would be by starting to look for a generic approach.

 For example, all the stakeholders (and I reallly hate that word) are really the same just different roles (and some with multiple roles). The Environment has several aspects as of now and more will come into play. There is a relationship among the Environment Factors. And finally the "Stakeholders" and The Environment have several attributes you need to track and record.

I did a system here for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency using the same concepts and it worked fine and provided a vastly superior capability for research and investigation then if they had remained in the "independent" stakeholder and environment factor mode.

 All the best Regards

Dr Amin Adatia MBA, PhD

amin@knowtech.ca KnowTech Solutions Inc

(www.knowtech.ca)

Ezine

IWC's monthly ezine

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 10, 2005

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Been trekking? Visited a tribal village? Or saw some amazing wildlife in a national park? Write in to iwc@indianwildlifeclub.com along with two good photographs. Published articles get paid.

Books

Books on nature, wildlife

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 10, 2005

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Read a book on nature or wildlife recently? Write a review here. It will reach a wide audience who love reading such books.

Bio-Diversity

Tourist revenues from bio-diversity

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 10, 2005

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The total forest cover in India is estimated to be 19.27 per cent of India's geographic area.

This area accounts for our bio-diversity, our natural wilderness heritage.

 Is bio-diversity an end by itself or a mere tool for obtaining tourist revenues?

 

E-Governance for Conservation

Can IT help in conservation related issues?

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 10, 2005

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I have uploaded a paper presented at an e-Government conference held in October 2005 at The Grand, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi.  The Conference "Conflux 2005"  was a joint effort by Centre for Science, Development and Media Studies (CSDMS), Government of NCT of Delhi along with Department of Information Technology, Government of India, UNDP, Danish Technological Institute and key academic and civil society organizations and various multilateral agencies. 

 The full presentation is uploaded at the following link

http://www.slideshare.net/susansharma/egovernance-for-conservation

The paper makes a case for the potential of e-Governance for creating jobs as a major byproduct. Giving livelihood options to fringe villages of national parks seems to be the only solution for avoiding man -animal conflicts and exploitation. If the livelihood options are related to protecting the parks, it becomes a win -win situation for conservation and people.

I am throwing the paper for a "no-holds barred discussion "by IWC members.  Please do add your valuable opinions.

Interlinking of Rivers

M.S Swaminathan on river linking

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 31, 2005

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Well-known agricultural scientist and chairman, National Commission on Farmers, M. S. Swaminathan, has favoured construction of the Polavaram project and for that matter any big project, provided the environmental and social aspects are taken care of. Speaking to reporters after meeting the Chief Minister, Y. S. Rajasekhara Reddy, on Thursday, he said such big projects were the need of the hour in the light of the Bharat Nirman programme under which 1 crore hectares of additional ayacut would be brought under the plough. It was not the first time that big projects were taken up in the world, he said, citing the Aswan Dam in Egypt and the Three Gorges project in China. Dr. Swaminathan, however, wanted a realistic assessment of benefits and risks before embarking upon any big project. If a particular project displaced tribals and others and affected the environment, sufficient steps must be taken up. "It's a win-win situation for people and the environment. There is no free lunch." Asked to comment on Medha Patkar's strong opposition to Polavaram project, he said, "some people are ideologically opposed to big dams and prefer smaller ones." He said his policies "are going on right direction." During the meeting, Dr Swaminathan and the Chief Minister discussed the need for bridging the gaps between scientific knowledge and field-level needs.

Interlinking of Rivers

Medha Patekar on River linking

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 31, 2005

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A day after the State Government secured the much-awaited environmental clearance for the Polavaram (Indirasagar) project, noted environmental activist Medha Patkar and the tribals facing displacement strongly opposed the Government's moves to go ahead with the project. "What the project has secured from the Centre is only environmental clearance. But there is no forest clearance yet which is mandatory for any major dam," Ms. Medha Patkar said at an interface with the adivasis. Asserting that the project was part of efforts to boost industrialisation at the expense of agriculture and tribal areas, she volunteered to spearhead the agitations to be launched by tribals against giving clearances to Indirasagar project in violation of the people's right to life and the right to livelihood guaranteed by the Constitution.

Interlinking of Rivers

Green Clearance for Andhra Project

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 28, 2005

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One of India's first river-linking projects, Polavaram, received the Centre's environmental clearance on 26th October 2005. The Pollavaram project(AP), renamed Indirasagar, aims at taking 80 TMC of water from river Godavari, the country's second-largest river, to river Krishna. The multi-purpose project, when completed, will irrigate some three lakh hectares of farmland and generate 960 MW of power.

The revised project cost is Rs 13,000 crore, of which Rs 4,000 cr is to be used exclusively to address environmental issues, apart from relief and rehabilitation of 48,000 families across 288 habitations.




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