Environment Awareness

World Environment Day and IndianWildlifeClub

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 03, 2017

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‘Connecting People to Nature’, the theme for World Environment Day 2017, implores us to get outdoors and into nature, to appreciate its beauty and its importance, and to take forward the call to protect the Earth that we share.

https://youtu.be/KcprppV0Re0

Environment Awareness

Ikebana by Ohara school from Gurgaon

Posted by Susan Sharma on January 23, 2016

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Exhibition of Ikebana by Ohara school from Gurgaon 


 Ohara School emphasizes seasonal qualities, natural growth processes, and the beauty of natural environments.





Ohara school of Ikebana specialises in bringing nature scenes to homes. With most people in urban areas living in multi -story flats with limited living space, it is all but easy to forget the beauty and happiness that natural landscapes provide.



 Learning Ikebana or flower arrangement where only real flowers and drift wood, seeds etc are used is a release for the creative aspirations of many a housewife. Collecting the materials which bring in harmony, which express the beauty of colors and arranging them as per the requirements of Ikebana is an art as is seen from the many arrangements pictured here.






Materials are arranged as if they are piled up in low flat containers with a wide surface area of water. It includes the Color Scheme Moribana, which expresses beauty of color, and the Landscape Moribana, in which the beauty of natural scenery is represented.


Traditional Method

This is a technique to express the beauty of scenery using limited materials, and arranging methods prescribed for these materials while observing their natural growth. This is a type of arrangement in which natural landscapes are represented in the limited space of flower containers.


Realistic Method

This is a technique to express scenic beauty by understanding the natural growth, environment, and the seasonal aspect of the material, and by mixing in the subjectivity and impressions of the arranger.









Environment Awareness

Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre

Posted by Sheikh Gulzaar on November 22, 2013

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Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre where I am working andhave to collect the data and if at this time the Government of Jammu andKashmir will cooperate than I will meet the ends of success. We must note itthat in future we will have clothes, homes but the food and medicine s will beshort as such shortage has to fulfill. We are living under the open sky that isright but living without food and medicine is IMPOSSIABLE.


More details:-
The JK Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre
"Ginkgo House" Aziz Abad, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR JK 192121
Mob:09858986794
Ph: 01933-223705
e-mail: jkmpic@gmail.com
home:
http://jkmpic.blogspot.in

Environment Awareness

Losing Habitat of Migratory Birds : Mote Majra, Mohali, Punjab, India

Posted by salil sharma on November 11, 2013

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Losing Habitat of Migratory Birds : Mote Majra

Mote Majra is a small village near Mohali which boasts of having  a rich fauna and flora too especially a great variety of birds. Last week there was a photograph with a caption

“ Winged Guests Are Here; Migratory Birds At Mote Majra in Mohali” by Vicky Gharu  in The Tribune. These migratory birds are not here for the entire winter but for a halt on their great migratory leap. So we planned to visit the visitors this weekend. To our utter surprise we could not locate even a single out of the flock despite waiting patiently for a long time. Yes there were some other birds of course like the common kingfisher, red wattle lapwing, Intermediate egret; Black winged Kite,Crow Pheasants and cormorants.

After a long wait we finally approached a local villager who told us that a person has hired the local pond on a contract for fishing and has put some people to work for him to put a net all over the pond so that the migratory birds are unable to catch the fish. This labour has been hired for an amount of 30000/. Now with no food on arrival, the migratory birds have no option but to carry on their migration path ahead. It’s really disheartening to see such human interference.

Water Bodies are providing the habitat to the local and migratory bird species and playing key role in maintaining the balance in natural environmental parameters. The human activities and interference are destroying the natural water bodies' characteristics thereby depriving the migratory birds of their natural habitat  at many places. There is a need to study such aquatic ecosystems for understanding the gravity of environmental problems and to find solutions to improve the habitat of migratory birds which directly help in protecting the bird species. The governments of such places should come forward to save the natural environment.

 

 

Environment Awareness

Invasive species in Western Ghats Rivers threatens the endemic aquatic fauna

Posted by Harikrishnanbhaskaran on July 19, 2012

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Western Ghats, the ancient mountain range in the southern India which is older than Himalayas is a new entrant to the league of Word Heritage sites for its rich biodiversity. However, new studies show that incidence of foreign type of organisms in these riverine environments is a main hazard for this World Heritage site. These non-native organisms introduced in the rivers of Western Ghats for agricultural purposes or as biological controllers, are gradually wiping away organisms found in these rivers, according to certain research outcomes.

Plants like Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes serve as good examples of alien plants in these rivers. Similarly, Salvinia molesta, Hydrilla and Ipomea fistulosa were first introduced as ornamental plants in aquariums but later became major weeds in these rivers. They cover the water surface, often increasing the rate of sedimentation. They also hinder the daylight which is essential for the underwater plants for photosynthesis. Mikania macarantha, is a similar plant now threatening biodiversity in the area. It forms a thick layer over the river surface and the connected riparian forest, blocking the sunlight. 

Exotic fishes add one more name to the list of foreign organisms causing threat to innate organisms in the Western Ghats Rivers. Introduced to control mosquito and diseases caused by them, these aquatic organisms have turned out to be enemies in course of time. Gambusia affinis, was widely introduced as a biological agent to control mosquitos. But now they have entered Western Ghats streams, raising stiff competition for resources with native species, wiping away them locally. This is dangerous when for the endemic fishes in Western Ghats Rivers

Clarias gariepinus, was brought in by farmers who wanted a fast growing fish which eats up everything including waste from slaughter houses, to increase fish production. But the fish known for its ability to survive in drastic conditions has turned out to be a serious threat to native species of fishes and other organisms when invaded main stream rivers.

Unlike other threats which destruct a river ecosystem, foreign species and the extent of the damage caused by them are often invisible for the naked eye for a long time if detailed research is not being carried out.  So the current studies show that there is a need to conduct more in-depth studies and take up conservation efforts to help the world heritage site from degrading further.there is also an urgent need for the government to formulate and implement a policy for the management of the invasive species in India. 

Environment Awareness

“Save the tiger, sure, but also spare a thought for the Indian honeybee.”

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 04, 2011

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The subcontinent has approximately 1,300 of more than 20,000 butterfly species known, said Kishen Das, a US-based lepidopterist. That’s about 6.5% of the global butterfly diversity.

However, the problem is that around 100 of the butterfly species found in India are nearing extinction, according to Surya Prakash, a professor at the department of life sciences at Jawaharlal Nehru University. “Few are aware of the crucial pollination role the butterfly plays, which is second only to the honeybee,” he adds.

There’s bad news on that front too.


Read more at

http://www.livemint.com/2011/09/29222646/Lower-pollinator-numbers-heral.html

Environment Awareness

Gaia's Garden - A Tribute to the Beauty We Have Lost

Posted by Chinmaya Dunster on September 07, 2011

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkcP3YsSEr4
Using paintings of vanished species and my own music I hope I can touch a few hearts to care for the threatened beauty around us.

Environment Awareness

Kids and environment

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 06, 2011

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Why Is America's Youth Staying Indoors?

•80 percent said it was uncomfortable to be outdoors due to things like bugs and heat
•62 percent said they did not have transportation to natural areas, and
•61 percent said there were not natural areas near their homes.

Read an interesting article at the link

http://www.nature.org/newsfeatures/kids-in-nature/kids-in-nature-poll.xml?src=gp

Environment Awareness

Wetlands not wastelands

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 02, 2011

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........."This is where policy gets practice fundamentally and fatally wrong. This is not useless wasteland as the revenue office described it when it gave it to the thermal power company at a pittance. This is highly productive land, both in terms of its ecological functions and economic uses. But we cannot see it or won’t because it is not in our interest.

Just consider. This dead swamp is a living sponge, which soaks water, reducing the intensity of floods; the delicately maintained freshwater balance reduces the advance of salinity, which would infiltrate groundwater and ruin drinking water sources. This is a living ecosystem. It plays critical life functions...................
 
-Sunita Narain
Read more at the link http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/lessons-kakarapalli


Environment Awareness

Sounds in a National Park

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 24, 2011

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Sounds in a National park

............The impact of noise on wildlife ranging from birds to whales to elk has been a growing focus of scientific study. Increasing evidence suggests that animals in natural settings modify their behavior, though sometimes only briefly, in response to human commotion..........

One of the first things that a visitor to Muir Woods National Monument sees is a monitor that measures sound levels.....

Once the diesel engines had been stilled, visitors began falling into line, heeding a subtle signal that human noises are superfluous here.

But some of the signals are hardly subtle: signs posted near Cathedral Grove in the heart of the park call for silence. Near the entrance to the food and gift shop close to the park’s entrance, a decibel meter measures the sound of a visitor’s voice.

Read more at the link   http://tinyurl.com/3h4qn2o


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/22/science/earth/22sound.html?_r=1&ref=nationalparkservice

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