nature/wildlife films

Connected!

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 25, 2017

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Nature lovers feel connected wherever they go!  I experienced this lately when I visited my cousin who lives in far away San Diego.  The cabbage butterfly I saw in the botanical garden of San Diego reminded me of Dr.Surya Prakash from whom I had learnt that the Indian cabbage butterfly migrates by flying 300 to 400 miles a year. It  is one of the three in India which migrate long distances.   Want to learn more fascinating facts about butterflies from Dr. Surya Prakash?  See the short film in our you tube channel 

The sparrow happlily mud bathing on the ground of an open restaurant reminded me of the sparrows mud bathing back home.  It also made me appreciate the fact that the restaurant owners who had grown local flowers all around, had made the ground  inviting for birds with leaf moulds and mulches.      

On a cruise in the Soth Pacific Bay, the tour guide kept calling attention to the naval might of the USA and the ships and drones which had occupied the shores of the Bay.  On one side a large group of Cormorants were busy fishing, reminding us how nature, especially birds, can adapt anywhere.  The sea lions displaced were huddled up on bait barges (because of which the cruise was called "Sea lion Cruise").  Having seen the interaction between a mum and pup sealions on the Pacific coast near the Torrey Pines Reserve,  the bait barges seemed like a zoo.  Again, the foresightedness to put these barges for sea lions lazy enough not to go to other available shores? was worth appreciating.  

Want to feel some of these emotions I went through?   Watch the short film at 

nature/wildlife films

Endangered species Day

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 20, 2017

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Endangered Species Day - 19th May 2017

In a world with natural habitats shrinking the wildlife that we share this wonderful planet with continue to become endangered. 
In India, many beautiful pheasants are endangered.  When the winged guardians of our mountainscapes disappear, the mountains will be poorer. 
Watch this short video on mountain pheasants 
https://youtu.be/Np5kMkXdvKI

nature/wildlife films

Sarang - The Peacock,review

Posted by Bhavesh on June 21, 2011

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How many times have we felt 'virtual proximity' to nature,just by watching a movie or a program on Discovery/Net Geo (for India,usually the credit goes to Tigers).Our problem is (Media included) we do not think of other animals,forget birds.For us,Tigers rule the rule books.

Fortunately,I got a copy of 'Sarang-The Peacock',last week.It's a wonderful account of Peacocks and their life made by Susan Sharma.Watching it is like a musical journey,too calm and soothing (thanks to the excellent music score).

Peacocks have always fascinated us,rains can't be imagined without a dancing peacock,making that 'eye catching' pattern.The whole 'web of life' including humans,snakes,squirrels and peachicks (new born peacock) is encircled in this beautiful narration.

Must watch for every Indian, at least we must know about our 'national bird'.Thanks Susan for this beautiful account.I am on my way to search out for peacocks in fields nearby. 

nature/wildlife films

The Peacock Courtship Dance- a video of a peacock displaying and dancing

Posted by Rakesh on June 03, 2010

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Indian Peacock (called Mayura in Sanskrit) has enjoyed a fabled place in India since ancient times. In imagery Lord Krishna  is always represented wearing a peacock feather tucked in his headband.

Ancient kings in India were said to have gardens to raise peafowl where guests were invited to see the peacock dance during the mating season. Due to this close relationship with humans for thousands of years, they have entered ancient Indian stories, songs and poems as symbols of beauty and poise. As the mating season coincides with the onset of monsoon rains and the month of Shravan in the Hindu calendar, many songs of rains have peacock-dance mentioned in them. One possible origins of the name of the famous Maurya dynasty of ancient India is probably derived from the word Mayura as the ancestors of the Mauryas are thought to be peafowl-keepers of a royal court in eastern India.
Hindu mythology describes the peafowl as the  vehicle or vaahan  for Karthikeya, also called Murugan, the brother of Ganesha, the goddess Saraswati, and the goddess  Mahamayuri.

watch the video of courtship displaying dance of Indian peafowl at my you tube link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-wqHP-CrWU
  
"http://flickriver.com/photos/desert_bikaner/"><img src="http://flickriver.com/badge/user/all/recent/shuffle/medium-horiz/ffffff/333333/34273112@N03.jpg" border="0" alt="desert_photographer - View my recent photos on Flickriver" title="desert_photographer - View my recent photos on Flickriver"/

Indian Peafowl displaying his train during the peafowl breeding season. Indeed, its sole purpose is to attract a mate. Seeing a peahen approaching, the peacock lifts his train—a cluster of long tail coverts that spread out to form a fan several feet high and extending down to the ground on both sides. The train feathers are iridescent blue and green, with an eye-like spot of brilliant blue, green, and orange, at the end. Each feather is a work of art in itself—together they make a spectacular backdrop for the sapphire blue peacock and his carefully orchestrated courtship dance: 1. During the breeding season, peacocks choose special places to perform their courtship dance and they tend to return to the same location year after year.

nature/wildlife films

Screening-A Tale of Two National Parks

Posted by Susan Sharma on April 17, 2008

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21 April  2008, at 7.30 PM

  

IndianWildlifeClub.com invites you to

 

“A Tale of Two National Parks”

 

Screening of two films  at the Epicentre, Gurgaon, on 21 April, 2008

 

Details:

Venue: Epicentre,

Apparel House, Sector 44, Gurgaon

Date: 21 April, 2008 (Monday)

Timing: 7.30 PM to 9.00 PM

 

Entrance is free

 

Films: “ Living with the Park”-Ranthambore National Park 

 

To Corbett with Love”-Corbett National Park

 

Both the films are directed by Dr.Susan Sharma who will introduce the films and interact with the audience. 

 

nature/wildlife films

Open University Films

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 16, 2007

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Open University Films

Here is an initiative by the Open University of Britain, well worth emulating by our own Indira Gandhi National Open University!

An epic journey across the length and breadth of Britain is continuing with The Nature of Britain, co-produced by The Open University and currently showing on BBC ONE, BBC TWO and BBC FOUR.

Presented by Alan Titchmarsh, The Nature of Britain concentrates on the unique ecology of different landscapes and eco-systems throughout the UK and the diverse behaviour of the animals and plants that live in them. During his journey, Alan shares his enthusiasm for the British wildlife, encouraging viewers to step outside and explore the natural history on their doorstep.

The series features eight key landscapes - Island; Farmland; Urban; Freshwater; Coastal; Woodland; Wilderness and Secret Britain. It paints a beautiful contemporary portrait of Britain’s wildlife and provides the definitive guide to The Nature of Britain.

............

"Wildlife is marvellous on TV but our local natural world is fascinating too. Every time I observe wildlife I see something - a plant, an animal, a pattern of behaviour, which I have not seen before. You don’t have to be a zoologist to experience this and the series shows some of the special things right on our doorsteps. The regional films will be great for informing viewers of what they can do locally to experience the natural world themselves and of how they can make a difference."

Source:  http://www.prweb.com/pingpr.php/SG9yci1FbXB0LVNpbmctSG9yci1UaGlyLVplcm8=

nature/wildlife films

Visual medium to educate about the impact of coal fired thermal projet

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 06, 2007

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Activists making use of various visual mediums

to create awareness on the project’s impact -Mysore

 With Minister for Energy H.D. Revanna asserting that the
Government has no option but to go ahead with its decision to set up
the 1,000-mw coal-fired thermal power plant at Chamalapura to meet the
increasing demand for power in the State, the movement opposing the
decision is being intensified in the urban and rural parts of Mysore.

Chamalapura Ushna Vidyut Sthavara Virodhi Horata Samanvaya Samithi is
making use of various visual mediums to educate farmers and people on
the impact of the project. While environmental organisations such as
the Mysore Amateur Naturalists is engaged in giving power point
presentations on how the project would affect flora and fauna in the
area, besides the life of poor farmers, students of Chamarajendra
Academy of Visual Arts (CAVA) are engaged in preparing publicity
material for the agitation.

A CAVA student has made use of an old building in Kukkarahalli village
to project the impact of the project. "Nirantara", a cultural
organisation, has produced "Baduki-Badukalu Bidi", a mini-documentary,
and is screening it in schools and colleges.

Farmers themselves have arranged the screening of "Matad Matadu
Mallige" which dwells on the plight of flower-growing farmers and how
they succeed in their fight. "Power V/S People: Struggle of
Chamalapura farmers", a documentary produced by Chandrashekar
Ramenahalli, is making waves in Chamalapura and surrounding villages.
As part of the campaign to create awareness among farmers,
Chandrashekar Ramenahalli, who has worked with Medha Patkar in the
Narmada Bachao Andolan, has produced the film with support from the
Chamalapura Anti-Thermal Plant Struggle Committee.

Chandrashekar Ramenahalli, a student of sociology, produced the
documentary in 15 days. The 35-minute documentary, which records the
opinions of farmers and energy experts, also throws light on the lush
green fields in the 12 villages where farmers harvest up to three
crops a year. 
 

Source:

http://www.thehindu.com/2007/09/26/stories/2007092656091000.htm

nature/wildlife films

Documentary on Sunderbans

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 04, 2007

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"Badabon-er Katha": A tale of the Sundarbans
The Sundarbans, the largest mangrove forest in the world, lies on the
Southwestern coastal areas of Bangladesh, forming a seaward fringe of
the delta. The Sundarbans is intersected by a complex network of
waterways, mudflats and small islands covered with mangrove forests,
and presents an excellent example of ongoing ecological processes. The
area is known for its wide range of fauna. There are about 334 species
of trees and plants and 450 species of animals in this forest - a
repository of diversity. Of these, there are 47 species of mammals,
270 species of birds, 45 species of reptiles and 200 species of fish.
A documentary film on the Sundarbans, titled Badabon-er Katha, was
premiered on August 18 at National Museum Auditorium. Under the
supervision of Manzarehassin Murad, Moynul Huda has directed the
documentary. It is a joint venture by Steps Towards Development and
Rupantor.
The documentary presents the scenic beauty of the Sundarbans in
different seasons, as well as the dependency of humans to the forest
for making their living.
Badabon-er Katha begins with images of spectacular beauty of the
majestic forest. The documentary features the diverse lifestyles of
people living in the Sundarbans, including fishermen, honey collectors
and others. Badabon-er Katha also highlights some natural and man-made
changes that are fast becoming threats to the existence of the
Sundarbans.
Prior to the screening of the film a discussion was held. Professor
Abdullah Abu Sayeed, Dr. Ainun Nishat (country representative of The
World Conservation Union Bangladesh), Ranjan Karmokar (executive
director of Steps Towards Development), Swapan Guha (CEO of Rupantar),
filmmaker Manzarehassin Murad and director of Badabon-er Katha, Moynul
Huda spoke at the event.
Referring to the Sundarbans as the "only sweet-water mangrove forest
in the world", Dr. Ainun Nishat said, "Three points of the forest are
listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. However, this rare heritage
site is under threat."
Professor Abdullah Abu Sayeed said, "This documentary will be a record
of the Sundarbans, if ever the largest mangrove forest in the world is
lost."
Source: 
http://www.thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=718

nature/wildlife films

Chinmaya Dunster

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 20, 2007

Blog

 

"In an age when nothing seems to move unless backed by the five-letter word “Money”, it is indeed surprising to find someone who creates a documentary woven around his own music to raise awareness about the state of India’s environment, more so when he urges people to make copies of his film and share it with others without any commercial aspect involved.


Chinmaya Dunster’s film is not a typical documentary – it is more a compilation of footages from a series of multimedia concerts recorded live at the Bharati Vidyapeeth Institute of Environmental Education and Awareness (BVIEER) in Pune in 2004 that is juxtaposed with poetry readings, interviews with environmentalists and educators and footage of scenery, wildlife and peoples from all over India, all in an effort to make people think."

Read the full article at

http://www.deccanherald.com/Content/Sep22007/finearts2007083122678.asp

See Dunsters films uploaded on youtube by visiting

http://www.youtube.com/group/wildbytes

nature/wildlife films

Film making in Africa

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 05, 2007

Blog

Here is a quote from a prominent African film authority, which is applicable to a large extent to the situation here in India as well.

"As an industry, wildlife and natural history filmmaking touches uniquely on three socio-economic issues which are crucial to the future of the African continent:

Firstly, in the wake of globalisation, if our rich natural resources are properly managed and developed, then independent and sustainable development in African countries will continue. It is crucial in the pursuit of African renewal and the new partnership for Africas development that such resources need to be exploited to the advantage of African people.

Second is the crucial issue of conservation and environmental protection - an issue which is not unique to Africa and requires international cooperation and resources to develop effective strategies in combating threats to our environment. Showcasing these issues on television internationally is an effective way to raise awareness and support for these causes.

The third issue is the development of the African film industry so that wildlife and natural history filmmaking is representative of all Africans. To achieve this, it is imperative to implement training programmes which will foster the development of black filmmakers and to change the current status of the industry. Put simply, the challenge is how do we make indigenous Africans not only the observed but the observers and the participants in telling the story about this continent.

We need to be conscious of this fact: if we are to ensure the survival of our environment and the prosperity of this industry, filmmaking must become representative and diverse. Africans are presently the trackers, the translators and the lodge servants in this industry, perhaps sometimes the odd ranger or national park representative... but rarely the arbiter of the story.


We are following through at pledges made at last year’s Wild Talk Africa conference to spend $1 million on developing the industry here and commissioning up-and-coming natural history filmmakers. From now on, through the NHU AFRICA, e.tv will produce 40 hours of programming a year, ranging from lower-budget/higher-quality series to blue chip documentaries.

So far we have commissioned films on frogs in Madagascar, a lake in Venda, desert elephants in Namibia, climate change in Africa, ground squirrels in the Kalahari, a southern African travel series, a wildlife rehab series in Johannesburg, a good news conservation series, and of course where would the NHU AFRICA be without films on cheetahs, sharks, wild dogs and crocodiles! Our aim is to work with international broadcasters on some of these productions and we are currently co-producing HD films with NHK, and Five in the UK and are in discussion with National Geographic over a few more".

-Marcel Golding
CEO
e.tv
Source: WildFilmNews July 2007

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