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Living

Posted by Raghava on February 08, 2014

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My blog provide you with observation and ideology from my professional and personal life. Captures many of the interesting creature in our surrounding. "Upcoming shortly"

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You and I can save the World.

Posted by Arindam Aditya on October 29, 2013

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For those people who are not interested in Wildlife-
         It is not necessary to you that you have to love wildlife or interest in wildlife. But just one request, Don't kill them or harm them. Animals are not harmful until you disturb them, so live them their own life. 

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Dedicated to Rani (White Indian desi dog)

Posted by smita harwani on September 06, 2013

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Itsnot easy to forget the helpless eyes of that innocent baby. Even in herchildhood stage she had understood & digested the mindset and frigidity ofthe so called humans. She doesn't have a mum but the people around her love andcare for her.

Buttoday when I saw her, she was alone with one foot badly and cruelly hurt. Herbone was visible through her swelled foot. Poor thing I thought. Even afterthis tragedy there was an element of contentment in her eyes. I am amazed how shecould be so much in peace. I couldn't see her state and busted out,immediately complaining god. I don’t know why but somewhere I found myself tobe responsible for her sufferings. She taught me a big lesson of life.

Shewas there on road – Alone – In Pain – Badly hurt – Hungry – Weak – full of dirtAnd I have a house – Quilt – Bed – Food – luxury – People around me – My mum –Friends – EVERYTHING…!!! WHY THIS INDIFFERENCE…??

Iam sure if I was in her state I would have quit long before. I don’t know aboutthe thing that is making her intention to live so strong but I lost myself toher. She is strong & tough; I tried to feed her with biscuits. She couldhardly eat them because blood was flowing out from her mouth, I don’t know howshe managed. But…. How could she understand so soon that it is uselesscomplaining… !!!

Sheis carrying so many things in herself, yet holds calmness on the face as if shealready had an experience of entire life time. She is so young yet so mature…

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My recent visit to Morni Forest Area

Posted by salil sharma on February 27, 2013

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Visited Morni Hills, DistrictPanchkula, Haryana this sunday. Already famous for its varied flora and fauna,Morni is infact a tiny village located on the foothill-zone of the shivaliks. Ametalled road connects morni with panchkula for a distance of about 20kms., onmajor district road 118 and is 3000 ft. above the mean sea level. morni hillshave two water bodies, small agricultural tracts and presence of river ghaggar.The reserved forest limit starts just as we take a turn towards morni from nadasahib, a gurudwara. a check post has been put up by the forest department, butfound it not operating on sunday. vehicular traffic, leading to a lot of noisekeeps the wild life at bay. i was amused to notice atlest 10 vehicles passingevery 10 minutes, with no limit to the speed and constant honking. as weentered the forest area we could find few monkeys and langoors on the road sideprobably just because of the feeding by passers by.


Moving a little ahead we heardthe chirping of some birds and stopped to notice what it was? with muchdifficulty, because of the vehicles moving constantly, we noticed a tree fullof berries on which some birds were sitting. to our surprise it was the white -eared bulbul. Also known as Himalayan Bulbul and white cheeked bulbul,a scarce resident in Haryana. The bird is found in wooded areas like mornihills and kalesar forests. Its local name is kushandra or bhooroo as told by a farmer locally


 so many of them fluttering from one tree toanother managing what little they could eat, scared of the noise. we stoodlifeless for around 10 to 15 min.

So that they come to the berry treeon the road side where we were waiting for them to be clicked. after they werepretty sure we were not a threat to them they started coming one after theother giving us a chance to click them.


We moved ahead searching for somemore birds. There was a group of some off road bikers enjoying driving on theturns of the hills. We found a red startsitting quietly on the branch of a tree at village mandana, the largest villagein morni hills. We managed to click.



 Little ahead we found the red whiskered bulbul also known as red vented bulbul, the singerbird of India. It probably looks like a musician with a turban on the top ofthe head-the crest. It has  a long tailand feeds on fruits, nectar and insects.


Morni has varied flora likebabul, kikar, bamboo, khair, amaltas, jamun trees are commonly seen on loweraltitude. As we move higher the type of vegetation changes to pines and chirtrees and temperature also falls suddenly. From mandana, the view of the plains is breathtaking.  The ghaggar river separates the tipra rangefrom morni hills. From the T-point we can turn back to chandimandir and alsotowards pinjore through thapli which also boasts of a famous nature camp.

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The legend of a British planter and a rogue bull

Posted by Gavaz Kanjiramnilkunnathil on January 22, 2013

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I had been to Parambikkulam Tiger Reserve of South India a couple of times particularly in a bid to observe as well as take some pictures of the shy giants of the Western Ghats, the gaur. These gentle animals were for long considered as buffaloes (bison) by even a good number of forest department hands, while factually they belong to the family that also boasts of our good old domestic cows.Although I had been able to watch some of these in close quarters, every time they ensured that I was not given the luxury of ample time in their company, which I desperately needed to carry out my work.

The herds I came across in both Parambikulam and Periyar Tiger Reserve were mostly comprised of cows, and rarely I got the sight of a full grown bull. So most of my ventures ended up with mere dung examinations and a number of photographs (most of which were distorted) when I, along with my talented snapper Arun Prakash, was headed for Nelliyampathy, I hadn't the slightest of ideas what was in store for us on the green hills that we thought were simply part of a tourist destination flaunting its enthralling plantation sceneries.

It was a local tea-vendor at the cool hilltop that gave us first of the hints that we had from the mystic place that had from the moment we had started driving uphill, began shrouding us with an air of extra-ordinariness. On our disclosing before the old man serving us an earthy tea, our curiosity in tracking and closely observing a herd of gaur, we noticed a vivid expansion of his brownish pupils as if having had an opportunity to express himself a bit deeply. Dear friends, he said, you definitely can't be at a better place, providing you have the guts to take them. His words were certainly sounding more than what it conveyed first time; and more, the chilly night breeze howling through the silhouettes formed by the gigantic trees against the late evening sky's dark blue evanescence, was adding some special effects to them, although a bit eerie.

The first impression did the work. The tea-vendor was drinking with us pretty late into the night. The phantom breeze had started surging as he started unveiling one of the most horrendous folklore of the area. "If you are here to watch the gaur, you definitely will; rather let me assure you that you will be accosted by one..a dreadful one." "See no man will be as sober as me when I say these words". "But why on the earth should a bovine solicit us, at least considering the fact we are entirely strangers in a strange land?", Arun just couldn't hold back his curiosity. "A bovine? Is that all respect you have for it gentlemen? Then let me make it clear, I fear you might not be facing cattle class, rather howbout meeting a ghost the next night?...The ghost of planter Hall...a bereft soul deprived of the care of his dream woman a long time back" "And let me inform you that it was only a while back a local witchdoctor was mauled by it to his doom".

The handsome blue-eyed British planter, Arthur Hall had travelled to the Nellies (Nelliyampathy Hills) after getting the crucial nod from the then ruler of Kochi  Rama Varma XIV. At that time, the Kalri Kovilakam  had almost acquired the custodianship of entire Nelliyampathy. Naturally, the planter had to meet the then chief of Kollangode as part of procedures. It should have been there he came across the elite royal lady of Vengunad, Dhathri Thampuratty. It will be fair to guess that if the beauty of the queen hadn't impressed the solid Briton, her feistiness absolutely would had. For she was the person that brought the family that was reeling under an imperious Ittapu Thampuran's (uncle to Dhaathri) tantrums back into prominence, through a court battle. Furthermore, the lady had defied a standing ban on Kalari martial arts in 1800's to reconstruct the Kalari palace in 1890, but this time for playing host to leading artists, dancers, philosophers and musicians of the day.

Through out our trek, the next morning the main subject of our conversation was 'how Hall must have acquainted with Dhathri and what might have transpired thereafter to turn a noble man into a vengeful soul in the body of an elegant beast' at least in the heart of a few people including our friendly tea-vendor, who . Then at the top of a plateau where from the slits on the rocky surface and in between sporadic massive boulders, grew green and juicy grass, we heard the first sounds that resembled the hoof-beat of an ungulate. The sounds were vivid but somewhere appeared a bit feeble that hardly could be linked to a one tonner beast. But still we had to be careful. Particularly since the tea-vendor had warned us of a rogue loner bull that had all the traits of any of those infamous loner tuskers of the Ghats. Although, we were secretly thrilled that we would be in just a mater of time hitting upon a decently built gaur, the one that might be carrying with it the legend of Hall, I would be lying if I say that there we were emphatically intrepid.

For a moment I was thinking about a plan B in case the animal behind the boulder, comes out, sees us and launches a decisive charge, and I did not waste any time in tipping Arun about it gesturing towards another huge boulder towards our left with rough sides, which would help in a smooth climb. Nevertheless, I don't think he should have had the least of concerns there, because for him even the mightiest of gaurs were timid as we had back in Periyar Tiger Reserve. But this can be a fallacy, for attitude of animals such as elephants, gaur, leopards, tigers and bears towards human beings can vary in different geographical locations. The leopards of Valparai and elephants of Peppara are good examples for this assessment. But here a small head graced with a pair of small twisted horns that came from behind the boulder insisted that I had no more speculations. The speculations will be laid aside at least for the time being as a Nigiri Tahr (wild goat) is undoubtedly the jewel of the rocky plateaus of the Ghats.

As the sun began extravagantly deluging the hills with its blessings  we decided to retire to our shelter, since the wild friends too would be doing more or less the same. Then in the afternoon hours we shall have enough time to roam around the fringes of coffee plantations and the adjacent bushes with a view to get closer to a foraging gaur herd. We launched our second outing on a colourful not when a giant squirrel (Malabar giant squirrel) rushed in from nowhere and playfully stringed above us munching on some forest fruit. The squirrel too was a loner much like the tahr we had come across in the morning. Felt strange since I have always maintained that tahr never foraged without company. On the other hand, gaur bulls are pretty inclined to straying out of the herds often only to return during the time when cows in the herd get into heat. The herds that congregate and focus on small pockets during dry season, they often disperse into the hills during the monsoons.

As the rains have been largely unpredictable in the recent times, one couldn't just  guarantee how the herds in Nelliyampathy would behave. Nonetheless, the matured solitary bull in the stories of the tea-vendor will be afraid of none as its formidable size and power can only be rivalled by the redoubtable tiger. Here too there are many cases of tigers being wasted by gaur. We had reached the fringes of the coffee plantation where starts the forest vegetation, when we heard a soft whistle from one of the dense grass thickets distributed ahead of us. Then we could see a couple of sturdy whitish horns with dark tips amidst the tall grass. Yes it is gaur... a bull, and it is alone much suiting the descriptions given by the tea-vendor. We kneeled down behind a bush to make sure that it does not have a glimpse of us, which might urge him to make that decisive charge. Although bulls are known to charge even without provocation, such behaviour can be more expected during dry seasons when they are made more short tempered than usual by the scorching heat and badgering parasitic insects.

Here the bull does not appear to be wandering in search of a receptive cow, instead looks content with what he has at his disposal in that moment - fresh, juicy and green grass. We waited for more than ten minutes behind the bush anticipating his moves. This was a massively built animal that could be weighing anything between 700 and 900 kg, the protruding ridge on its forehead was quite high. The pale yellowish white shade dominating its horns and the thin hair growth on its back indicate that the animal is ageing. It was just about 30 metres between the animal and the spot we were occupying. Arun was so engrossed in snapping the grandeur of the animal that he simply lost the itchy sensation of a battalion of leeches clinging on to his body tasting his vital body fluid. Damn parasites!!! It was a pent up swear, even which was more than enough to attract the bull's attention. And lo! there he stands fully out of the thicket seriously staring at us. "Shall we bolt?", whispered to me a seriously intimidated Arun. "Wait", said I. "Let us watch it for some more time if he shows signs of charging we shall take to one of those silver oak trees marking the boundary of the coffee plantation."

Exchange of stares went on for a few more minutes. Minutes that appeared to be hours since everything ran through our minds during the time from the brownish eyes of the tea-vendor to the prominence of Dhathri to the elegance of planter Hall. Then someone had to make the first move and much to our delight it was the gaur that digressed and started focusing back on his rich food, Now we have the liberty to step out of the bushes infested by leeches to the nearby rock boulders from where we can have a clear view of the ghost of Hall, which had almost began drifting away from us, heading for the denser greens of the Nelliyampathy forests; leaving us a different story to tell the tea-ventor of Nellies. Then what if he says the one seen by us was not the rogue of his tale? Arun hardly waited to muse on that, "In that case, we will have to comb these forests once more, as simple as that"

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manali

Posted by vinay kumar on January 22, 2013

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it is awesome of nature of manali

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Proteins sweeter than Carbohydrates!

Posted by Kumarasamy on October 23, 2012

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General

Nature and today

Posted by shruthi on December 20, 2011

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Nature is a small manifestation of heaven on earth. Every subtle breeze, the roll of thunder rejuvenates and fills us with awe. Science strives to safeguard and use nature without much interference; and Art has striven to appreciate it, for centuries. Both Art and Science together has produced amazing music, in appreciation of nature (Bjork-Biophilia)

 Nature is irreversibly connected to us. Studies of evolution or creationist theories only prove that. And the connection of man with nature ,needs to be embraced and safeguarded.

Without the combination of talents from all fields to protect all that’s left to protect. Natures life blood will cease to flow; if we turned a blind eye to it,today.

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Rescue Tortoise & Giving Shelter to them

Posted by Siddharth Mehta on August 10, 2011

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Hello Friends, 

Me and my friends have started a small home based adopting and rescuing the tortoise and turtle. The main aim behind this is to support the species and stop them from getting away from our life. I got huge space to accommodate more then 100 Tortoise and we do have one doctor looking after them. Right now we do have some but all are males and i am looking to bring some females for their company  :-) Kindly help me as much you all can. 

Thanks for reading.

Regards
Sidd  

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"Green Accounting"

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 24, 2011

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"Part of the problem arises from the fact that we do not have a system of “green accounting”. Economists estimate GDP which is gross domestic product as a broad measure of national income and also estimate NDP which is net domestic product which accounts for the use of physical capital. But as yet, we have no generally accepted system to convert Gross Domestic Product into Green Domestic Product that would reflect the use up of precious depletable natural resources in the process of generating national income. Many years ago, the noted Indian environmentalist Anil Agarwal had advocated the concept of a Gross Nature Product to replace the usually estimated Gross National Product................

 .........Economists all over the world have been at work for quite some time on developing a robust system of green national accounting but we are not there as yet. Ideally, if we can report both Gross Domestic Product and Green Domestic Product, we will get a better picture of the trade-offs involved in the process of economic growth. Alternatively, as some economist have argued, we need alternative indicators to measure true welfare improvement, as Green GDP is not be the best indicator of sustainability or future increases in consumption or welfare – indicators such as “Genuine Savings/Investment”, and “Genuine Wealth Per Capita” are being developed as alternatives. We don’t need precise numbers. Even a broad-brush estimate will be a huge step forward to give practical meaning to the concept of “sustainable development” which all of us swear by in theory.

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta at Cambridge University has calculated that the “genuine” domestic investment rate in India is around 2.3 percentage points lower than the normally reckoned domestic investment rate for the period 1970-2001 after taking into account environmental costs and both calculated as a proportion of GDP. He goes on to show that as against the estimated growth rate of India’s per capita GDP of 2.96% per year during this period, the growth rate of per capita genuine wealth after taking into account environmental costs works out to 0.31% per year."


Read full speech by Jairam Ramesh,
Minister of State (Independent Charge), Environment and Forests, Government of India at the link

http://tinyurl.com/5vg8ykg

[Open in new window]
http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3232:jairam-ramesh-on-environment-and-development&catid=110:home-page

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