Eco-travel

Morni Hills, Chandigarh

August 15, Independence Day-An ideal day to check out the hill station near to Chandigarh since we were already in Chandigarh on a visit. The weather was good. It had rained for two days so the drive up was picturesque. We stopped the car many times just to take in the scenery. On the way we passed many other cars doing the same. Ha! this is like heaven after the hustle bustle of daily life. View of Chandigarh from half way up Morni Hills, on the Shivalik range Lush green creeper, the leaves of which are used for making leaf plates(patthal) " Nature Camp, Forest Department" My husband noticed the board. Shall we check this out? But then we cannot make it to the top which is still 12 km away. Remember we need to go back by evening." A quick decision was made -nature camp it is. After all Forest Dept would have selected the most scenic spot on the hill, I reasoned. It was a scenic spot. On top of a small hill surrounded by nurseries for trees and freshly planted variety of trees. The thatched roof dining hall looked inviting. The stilted huts reminded us of the tourist huts we had seen in the islands of South Korea. The carefully tended nursery at nature camp Scenic view from nature camp. Double click on the photo and notice the blue water tank on the left. Thatched roof dining hall Stilted huts for tourists to stay But the place seemed strangely quiet. No tourists were visible. A few workers appeared. " Madam, we have not started operations. After the place was built we found there is no water here. The water table is so low and the khads (rivulets fed by rain water) below are always bare because of mining." Mining? "Yes, the auction for this year is about to begin." We decided to take a different route back to Chandigarh. A short cut from the other side of Morni Hills. A road not well developed and full of potholes. Each pothole reminded us of the reality of our country's serious efforts to preserve the pristine. The roadside was dotted with trucks and stone crushers for miles on end. The houses and slum dwellings seemed to have just one focus-cutting the mountain, mining the stones and crushing them. Down the hill from the other side- (Double click on the photo, a truck is there near the dwelling ) The Shivalik Hills sliced and cut for mining The alternate route is certainly not inviting! Stone crushers and trucks dot the landscape on all sides Close up view of crushed Shivalik Slums of stone workers -a few yards from Chandigarh city We entered Chandigarh city, into the up market residential colony, Panchkula. The beauty of Morni Hills seemed a distant dream, even though we had experienced it just an hour ago.

Wish to write a comment on this trip report?  Visit

http://travelphotolog.blogspot.com/2009/08/trip-to-morni-hills-chandigarh.html

Events

Screening of nature films

 

 for a living planet                      World Wide Fund for Nature-India

                                                                             172 B, Lodi Estate, New Delhi 110 003

                                                                        Tel:  41504815/4816/4817/4819

                                                       Fax: 4150-4779/4795 E Mail: rbakshi@wwfindia.net

=========================================================================================

 

FILMS TO BE SCREENED AT INDIA INTERNATIONAL CENTRE – 2009

 

November 7, 2009 – HOME - A film by Yann Arthus-Bertrand- Duration 90 minutes - Home, the first film by the photographer - well-known for his series of Earth from Above images - highlights the treasures of planet Earth and the marks that humans leave behind. It aims to inspire global action by raising awareness of our shared responsibility for the planet and all of its inhabitants This visually dramatic special illustrates the planet's fragile state entirely from a birds-eye view in stunning high definition. With spectacular aerial views from more than 50 countries, viewers will see the extent of human impact on our landscapes. And not a moment too soon: In the past 50 years --a single lifetime -- the Earth has been more radically changed than by all previous generations of humanity.

 

December 19, 2009 – English – 24 minutes -  Living with the Park – Ranthombore National Park  = The film is a look at the popular tiger reserve as an integrated universe comprising its animals and people in the adjoining areas. The forests connects the two and neither one can flourish with the other.  So is the policy of segregating the park as a preserve for animals alienating the people who lived in harmony with the park for decades, helping the Park. There are no quick answers.  The film depicts the main attraction of the park the Bengal Tiger which is in danger of getting decimated here, as it has already happened in Sariska earlier.  Is it time we looked outside the park for the reasons, at the humanity which is living outside, their lives still connected to the Park – the people who are living with the park.  Filmed and directed by Dr. Susan Sharma.

 

TO CORBETT WITH LOVE -  ENGLISH – 24 MINUTES

Corbett National Park nestles in the foothills of the Himalayas. It is the first national park of the Indian sub-continent and was the launching pad for the region's ambitious conservation plan called Project Tiger in 1974. This 24 minute video was exclusively shot in Corbett Park and portrays the park’s magnificent forests with their rich flora and fauna which attract more than 48,000 tourists annually. The park consists tigers, elephants, deer, ghariyals etc. and some 500 odd species of birds. The film looks at the conversion of Jim Corbett, the Nainital- born Britisher who founded the National Park, from hunter to protector of wildlife. In the film you can meet Subedar Ali, the mahout who survived a tiger attack, spent a year in hospital and then came back to work in Corbett Park as a mahout, taking photographers and tourists for jungle trips. The film is a tribute to the silent protectors of the tiger. Filmed and directed by Dr. Susan Sharma. Dr Susan Sharma – director of the film will introduce and have interaction session with audience for both of the films.

Venue: India International Centre Conference Room I & Main Auditorium, 40 Max Mueller Marg, New Delhi - 110003     TIMING – 6:30

For further information please contact: Mr Raj Pal Singh,Network Services and Supporter Relations, World Wide    Fund for Nature-India, Pirojsha Godrej National Conservation Centre, 172 B, Lodi Estate, New Delhi, 110003    = Tel: 41504815-19/41504808 E-mail:  rbakshi@wwfindia.net

 

 

Events

Screening of nature films

 

 for a living planet                      World Wide Fund for Nature-India

                                                                             172 B, Lodi Estate, New Delhi 110 003

                                                                        Tel:  41504815/4816/4817/4819

                                                       Fax: 4150-4779/4795 E Mail: rbakshi@wwfindia.net

=========================================================================================

 

FILMS TO BE SCREENED AT INDIA INTERNATIONAL CENTRE – 2009

 

 December 19, 2009 – English – 24 minutes -  Living with the Park – Ranthombore National Park  = The film is a look at the popular tiger reserve as an integrated universe comprising its animals and people in the adjoining areas. The forests connects the two and neither one can flourish with the other.  So is the policy of segregating the park as a preserve for animals alienating the people who lived in harmony with the park for decades, helping the Park. There are no quick answers.  The film depicts the main attraction of the park the Bengal Tiger which is in danger of getting decimated here, as it has already happened in Sariska earlier.  Is it time we looked outside the park for the reasons, at the humanity which is living outside, their lives still connected to the Park – the people who are living with the park.  Filmed and directed by Dr. Susan Sharma.

 

TO CORBETT WITH LOVE -  ENGLISH – 24 MINUTES

Corbett National Park nestles in the foothills of the Himalayas. It is the first national park of the Indian sub-continent and was the launching pad for the region's ambitious conservation plan called Project Tiger in 1974. This 24 minute video was exclusively shot in Corbett Park and portrays the park’s magnificent forests with their rich flora and fauna which attract more than 48,000 tourists annually. The park consists tigers, elephants, deer, ghariyals etc. and some 500 odd species of birds. The film looks at the conversion of Jim Corbett, the Nainital- born Britisher who founded the National Park, from hunter to protector of wildlife. In the film you can meet Subedar Ali, the mahout who survived a tiger attack, spent a year in hospital and then came back to work in Corbett Park as a mahout, taking photographers and tourists for jungle trips. The film is a tribute to the silent protectors of the tiger. Filmed and directed by Dr. Susan Sharma. Dr Susan Sharma – director of the film will introduce and have interaction session with audience for both of the films.

Venue: India International Centre Conference Room I & Main Auditorium, 40 Max Mueller Marg, New Delhi - 110003     TIMING – 6:30

For further information please contact: Mr Raj Pal Singh,Network Services and Supporter Relations, World Wide    Fund for Nature-India, Pirojsha Godrej National Conservation Centre, 172 B, Lodi Estate, New Delhi, 110003    = Tel: 41504815-19/41504808 E-mail:  rbakshi@wwfindia.net

 Talk on "Conserving Wildlife in Agricultural areas" by K.S.Gopi Sundar

Friday, 4th December, 2009

 

India International Centre

40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate, New Delhi-110003

Web Page

Link of the month

The Museum of Trees in Chandigarh, India seeks to preserve, protect and promote conservation through a unique programme of AWARENESS, EDUCATION & ACTION.

The Museum of Trees, the first of its kind in the world, is a story telling Museum which tells the story – the myths, customs, traditions and historical events behind every tree that is planted outdoors or exhibited indoors.

 Link

http://www.museumoftrees.org/

 




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