Bird Sanctuaries

Sarahan-a sanctuary for mountain birds

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 12, 2018

 
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Mountain pheasants are seen in the Himalayan region.  In India they occur in Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim and J&K. Neighboring countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan also have some.   Pheasants are the Winged guardians of Mountainscapes. Pheasants are the species of birds to which our national bird, the peacock, belongs.

 

Pheasants are  an indicator species for the health of our mountains. About a third of all the pheasants in the world are found in India. While many pheasants have been reduced to birds for captive breeding (like the jungle fowl) or as game birds in the US and Europe, several parts of Asia still have the wild population. Seeing a tragopan in the wild can be compared only to seeing a tiger in the wild for the first time. The round black-bordered white spots or ocelli on the tragopan's feathers make it look like the King of Birds studded with diamonds all over.  No wonder the local names for the tragopan are "Jewar" and "Sonalu".  The tragopan is the state bird of Himachal Pradesh.

 

The beautiful monal pheasant, 'the bird of nine colours', is the state bird for nd Uttarakhand and Nepal.  Monal feathers used to adorn the Kinnaur Caps of wealthy persons. Now their use is banned officially.

 

The birds cannot  be viewed as game birds as most of the Western community does but these birds are the  winged guardians of our mountainscapes. The pheasants are more than just beautiful birds, for they also have scientific value for environmentalists and ecologists. Years of research have shown that Himalayan pheasants are mostly found in moist, temperate forests where there is a thriving community of oak trees. Oaks are important in ecological terms because they grow only in forests that are mature with plenty of healthy undergrowth in the form of vibrant grasses and bushes and a wide array of specialized tree species.  After establishing the close link between oak trees and pheasants, ecologists have reached the conclusion that a fall in pheasant population mirrors an adverse change in the mature forest habitat.

 

The hills and valleys of the Himalayan ranges are the only areas left in the world where these exotic birds species still exist in their natural surroundings. Western Tragopan, Himalayan Monal, Cheer, Koklass and Khaleej - the mountainscapes exist because they exist.  Anyone living in the mountains will vouch for the Himalayan Monal whose calls warn the ground dwelling animals like musk deer, tahr and bear of approaching hunters /poachers. It is high time we removed the tag of game birds from pheasants.

 

See our short film

Sarahan-a Sanctuary for mountain birds

https://youtu.be/6xZtmM0uIZg

Bird Sanctuaries

Keoladeo National Park

Posted by Pranay Rai on February 21, 2016

 
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Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, also known as Ghana Bird Sanctuary, is one of the best bird sanctuaries in the world.
The name Keoladeo comes from the temple of Lord Shiva which is located in that area. And Ghana means ‘dense’. The sanctuary is a heaven for animal lovers and bird watchers.
The park is open throughout the year, although, the best experience of watching the migratory birds and pythons, comes in the winter months from mid October to February. December is considered to be the ideal month for bird watching as a plethora of birds can be seen.
The park allows the visitors to hire bicycles and rickshaws for the tour.
A narrow road, fit for cycling, winds its way throughout the park surrounded by dense green forest.
A sweet chirping of various birds can be heard in the magnificence of the forest. A large variety of birds can be seen basking in the sun, feeding the chicks, soaring high in the sky, plunging into the water bodies for fishes.
Along with the umpteen birds, mammals such as the Spotted Deer and Nilgais can be spotted.
On our visit, in September this year, a male Spotted Deer stag was seen crossing the road. It stood there for a few seconds, flaunting its majestic body, and then disappeared in the bushes.
A Nilgai was spotted running through the swamp waters, creating a sudden ruckus which alarmed the birds around the place. The then serene scene was filled with boisterous chirping and splashing of water in no time.
Frogs can be heard croaking around the muddy and still water of the marsh. Snails can be easily and abundantly found in the bogs.
The best thing about the park is the independency for the tourists. There are no limitations in the safari timings and zones. A person can go anywhere and can stay in the park until the sun sets. Guides, possessing an ample amount of knowledge about the flora and fauna and about the park, can be hired accordingly by paying an extra amount along with the tickets and bicycle charge.
The park is a bliss for the wildlife enthusiasts and is one of the must visit places in Rajasthan.


Bird Sanctuaries

Subject is to ask permission to upload my photos of birds

Posted by Vijay Kumar on January 23, 2016

 
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I want to upload some photos . I believe it will be useful to you. - vijayakumar 

Bird Sanctuaries

Bhitarkanika-Packages

Posted by Alok Kumar Maharana on February 28, 2015

 
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Bhitarkanika Eco Wildlife Tour Orissa
Witness the Green Peace Eco System
Bhitarkanika Eco-Wildlife Tour Package 04 03 Nights / 04 Days : Ex- Bhadrak
  DAY WISE ITINERARY
  Day 01 : Jayanagar Khola-Jungle Resort

Morning arrival at Jayanagar Jetty. On arrival board on Boat to Khola-Jungle Resort. After lunch cruise to Kalibhanja Diha, Dhamara Port & Dhamarai Temple. Dinner & Overnight at Forest Lodge / Sand Pebbles Jungle Resort.

  Day 02 : Ekakula

Early morning board on boat to Ekakula with pack breakfast and lunch. Overnight at Forest Lodge / Sand Pebbles Jungle Resort.

  Day 03 : Bhitarkanika

After breakfast visit to different creeks to spot crocodiles, Bird Sanctuary & trekking to Hunting tower of ancient king. After lunch visit of Crocodile Breeding Centre & Museum. Dinner & overnight at Forest Lodge / Sand Pebbles Jungle Resort.

  Day 04 : Jungle Resort Khola/Jayanagar Jetty

After breakfast drop to Jayanagar jetty for onward journeys.

Book this package
 
Click Here for Other Important Information

Bird Sanctuaries

My recent visit to Morni Forest Area

Posted by salil sharma on February 27, 2013

 
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Visited Morni Hills, DistrictPanchkula, Haryana this sunday. Already famous for its varied flora and fauna,Morni is infact a tiny village located on the foothill-zone of the shivaliks. Ametalled road connects morni with panchkula for a distance of about 20kms., onmajor district road 118 and is 3000 ft. above the mean sea level. morni hillshave two water bodies, small agricultural tracts and presence of river ghaggar.The reserved forest limit starts just as we take a turn towards morni from nadasahib, a gurudwara. a check post has been put up by the forest department, butfound it not operating on sunday. vehicular traffic, leading to a lot of noisekeeps the wild life at bay. i was amused to notice atlest 10 vehicles passingevery 10 minutes, with no limit to the speed and constant honking. as weentered the forest area we could find few monkeys and langoors on the road sideprobably just because of the feeding by passers by.


Moving a little ahead we heardthe chirping of some birds and stopped to notice what it was? with muchdifficulty, because of the vehicles moving constantly, we noticed a tree fullof berries on which some birds were sitting. to our surprise it was the white -eared bulbul. Also known as Himalayan Bulbul and white cheeked bulbul,a scarce resident in Haryana. The bird is found in wooded areas like mornihills and kalesar forests. Its local name is kushandra or bhooroo as told by a farmer locally


 so many of them fluttering from one tree toanother managing what little they could eat, scared of the noise. we stoodlifeless for around 10 to 15 min.

So that they come to the berry treeon the road side where we were waiting for them to be clicked. after they werepretty sure we were not a threat to them they started coming one after theother giving us a chance to click them.


We moved ahead searching for somemore birds. There was a group of some off road bikers enjoying driving on theturns of the hills. We found a red startsitting quietly on the branch of a tree at village mandana, the largest villagein morni hills. We managed to click.



 Little ahead we found the red whiskered bulbul also known as red vented bulbul, the singerbird of India. It probably looks like a musician with a turban on the top ofthe head-the crest. It has  a long tailand feeds on fruits, nectar and insects.


Morni has varied flora likebabul, kikar, bamboo, khair, amaltas, jamun trees are commonly seen on loweraltitude. As we move higher the type of vegetation changes to pines and chirtrees and temperature also falls suddenly. From mandana, the view of the plains is breathtaking.  The ghaggar river separates the tipra rangefrom morni hills. From the T-point we can turn back to chandimandir and alsotowards pinjore through thapli which also boasts of a famous nature camp.

Bird Sanctuaries

Jayakwadi Bird Sanctury

Posted by Mayur Rajput on January 12, 2013

 
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I have visited jayakwadi bird sanctuary situated near Aurangabad- 60km distance; one of the best places near by.  I have sighted around 120 species of birds there in one trip including greater flamingo, eurasian spoonbill, long tailed godwit, whisked tern,grey heron, small blue kingfisher and many more!

Bird Sanctuaries

Thol Lake

Posted by Deep on March 05, 2012

 
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   Thol lake is  near to Ahmadabad. It was amazing to watch birds and beauty of Nature. You can see all pictures of that visit on my Facebook page 

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.215254758546947.54755.100001872734767&type=3&l=db8aa62bd2

Bird Sanctuaries

Udaipur to LRK via THOL

Posted by Sharad Agrawal on February 02, 2012

 
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On Jan 26th we ( Mr. Rishiraj Deval , Mr. Amit Gupta & My Self ) started our journey from Udaipur to Littile Rann Of Kutch via Thol Sanctuary in Ahemdabad.

Here is the checklist of birds we saw during this trip:

001. Great White Pelican

002. Dalmatian Pelican

003. River Tern

004. Great Cormorant

005. Wiskered Tern

006. Brahminy Starling

007. Little Cormorant

008. Pallid Harrier

009. Painted Sandgrouse

010. Rosy Starling

011. Indian Cormorant

012. Montagu's Harrier

013. Common Myna

014. Little Grebe

015. Marsh Harrier

016. Eurasian Collared Dove

017. Bank Myna

018. Great Egret

019. Laughing Dove

020. House Crow

021. Intermediate Egret

022. Common Kestrel

023. Spotted Dove

024. Little Egret

025. Grey Francolin

026. Blue Rock Pegion

027. Red-vented Bulbul

028. Western Reef Egret

029. Rose ringed parakeet

030. White Eared Bulbul

031. Cattle Egret

032. Barred Button Quail

033. Greater Coucal

034. Common Babbler

035. Grey Heron

036. Indian Peacock

037. Asian Koel

038. Red-throated Flycatcher

039. Indian Pond Heron

040. Common Crane

041. Wolly Necked Stork

042. Common Moorhen

043. Short-eared Owl

044. Common Coot

045. Lesser Flamingo

046. Spotted Owlet

047. Painted Stork

048. Black Winged Stilt

049. White Throated Kingfisher

050. Indian Roller

051. Isabelline Wheatear

052. Eurasian Spoon Bill

053. Green Beeeater

054. Variable Wheatear

055. Black Headed Ibis

056. Red Wattled Lapwing

057. Common Hoopoe

058. Desert Wheatear

059. Glossy Ibis

060. Little Ringed Plover

061. Pied Bushchat

062. Black Ibis

063. Kentish Plover

064. Common Stonechat

065. Spot Bill Duck

066. Black Tailed Godwit

067. Eurasian Wigeon

068. Ruff

069. Ashy Crowned Sparrow Lark

070. Tawny pipit

071. Northern Pintail

072. Rufous tailed Lark

073. Ezyptian Vulture

074. Paddy Field Pipit

075. White browed Wagtail

076. Garganey

077. Red Shank

078. White Wagtail

079. Shoveler

080. Crested Lark

081. Yellow Wagtail

082. Green Shank

083. Citrine Wagtail

084. Black Shouldered Kite

085. Purple Sunbird

086. Common Sandpiper

087. Red-rumped Swallow

088. Indian Silverbill

089. Shikra

090. Wire Tailed Swallow

091. Scaly bellied Munia

092. Black Drongo

093. House Saprrow

094. Common Buzzard

095. Imperial Eagle

096. Rufous tailed Shrike

097. Steppe Eagle

098. Baybacked Shrike

099. Grey Leg Goose

100. Long-tailed Shrike

101. Pied Avocet

102. Pallid Scops Owl

103. Grey Headed/Canary Flycatcher

104. Eurasian Wigeon

105. Darter

106. Purple Heron

107. Grey Heron

108. Red Crested Pochard

109. Osprey

 

plz for give me for spellings if any ..Still missing lots of species & will be back for them soon ...

 

Thank you all for your time to read this check list.

Regards

Sharad Agrawal

Bird Sanctuaries

Bandipur - Trails of a Wanderer

Posted by KrishnanKP on January 20, 2012

 
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http://kpkrishna.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/trip-report-bandipur-national-park/

Bird Sanctuaries

nose and air polution,bir prevention

Posted by harshal on December 10, 2011

 
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when we are go to nal sarovar,they stop car before 2 km because  the reason is noise and air polution prevention...but after that there are auto riksa for go to ..nalsarovar...that riksa are more noisy and poluted....why they are doing so....i don't understand the reason,,,
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