Wild Elephants

Elephant fence in Malawi

Posted by chinku on December 09, 2011

 
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A 12 km stretch of solar-powered electric fencing has already been erected along the eastern boundary of  the Thuma Forest Reserve to avoid deadly confrontations between local farmers and marauding elephants.

However, confrontations  continue south of the already established fence and the community is appealing to urgently extend the elephant-proof fence for another 24 km.

This fence will not only save the community crop losses from elephant raids but also protect the Thuma elephant population from angry farmers.  Please support us to finance the next stretch of fence to protect both people and elephants.

Climate change and Global Warming

SUNDERBANS: submerging islands

Posted by rohit on December 01, 2011

 
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PLIGHT FOR INHABITANTS 
A study by WWF named VOICES OF CHANGE interviewed many people from Sundarbans and Laddakh  regarding changes they have observed during their life time  in their surroundings and climate.
In Sundarbans, the most common and generalised problem was the erosion of the islands  foot by foot as they are pushed more in land to prevent their fields from infertility bestowed by sea water that too for many coming years .
Few older chaps from the community recalls with fear in their eyes those horrible when their homes been swept away by sea waters, instead of having embankments with good enough height.
REASON : In early days , these embankments used to be entangled with the vegetation around them(mangroves) which gave support to them , which today as a result of habitat degradation and deforestation  by the people themselves for preparing agricultural fields are completely gone and these naked embankments are as week as deck of cards and standing just for name sake.

In the recent years many new embankments have been made after repeated collapsing but because of lack of that man groove vegetative support , people are erecting them to collapse once more.

A NEW STUDY GIVING STARTLING RESULTS
Queen’s University, Belfast, and Institute of Environment Studies & Wetland Management (IESWM)  researchers are going to give a new dimension to the climate related concerns in sundarbans.
They postulate that uninhabited islands are higher in level than inhabited islands. They support this fact by the observation that in inhabited islands the embankments prevent the sea waters form coming in and hence their is no new sedimentation over the islands where as in uninhabited islands they are abundant CREEKS and no restrictive embankments so facilitating sedimentation. 
Now this study group is planing to take on radiocarbon study of sediments deep in soil to find out the rate of sedimentation and then comparing it to rate of rise in sea level to find out  that is this sedimentation really competingwith  the sea level rise and thereby have prevented the uninhabited islands from inundation and submerging .
If this goes in favor the hypothesis then the researchers would go upto advice that we can depopulate the islands to help them survive the rising sea level.

Bird Sanctuaries

To the wonderful world of birds

Posted by niranjana. on November 30, 2011

 
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 Thattekkad bird sanctury is a very important bird sanctury in kerala situated in Eranakulam district.
Our nature camp in 2011-2012 is to here which is known by the name of Salim Ali.
                                 On 17th November our team(26 students & 5 teachers) started the journey at 9 am.At 11 am we see 
kerala kalamandalam and reached thattekkad at 3.30 pm.One nature camp is not only the trekking.It has many levels.
Fist level is inaguration.We are very lucky to that we got Dr.R.Sugathan sir to inagurate our camp.He worked 16 years
with Salim Ali.
                               Our first duty is self discribtion.All said about their name,house,hoby,ambition and for what we have came to thattekkad.
Next camp convenor Sivadasan sir divided us into three groups.First group SALIM ALI wanted to write about five birds .
Second group(including me) HORN BILL  got trees and third group CEYLON FROGMOUTH got medicinal plants.
After dinner first day ended.
                              Next day morning at 8.00 am our trekking started.First our eyes stukked at the trees and plants.
Next at the birds.To watch birds,we divided to two batches.First team(including me) reached on the top of a rock.
10-20 hill maina flied three times around us.It was an amazing scene.
                     There are four type hornbills.We see Malabar grey horn bill(Ocyceros griseus) on the top of a tree.We can see the changes 
arond that we endered to semi ever green forest.We can see the very rare bird ceylon frogmouth.Ceylon frogmouth!
It wondered all of us.It has the color of dry leafs.We can only see malabar giant squirell in animals.But we are very lucky 
that we can see many birds including hornbill,Rose winged parakeet,Grackle,Emaraled dove,Oriole,Paradise fly catcher.
In the way,we reached a watc tower.But it is not very taller.We can see the mysterious beauty of forest in around of the watch tower.
                          In the bank of periyar we can see the pugmark of porcupine.After a 15 minutes walk we reched the top 
of a hill.We can see the bridge near our doormitory.We can see Munnar hills in one side and Malayatoor hills in the other side.
Truely it is a 'view point'.then we walk through a teak plantation.At 1.00 pm we reached doormitory.After the lunch,it is time to
talk with Dr.Sugathan sir.He talk us about the history of thattekkad.In 1933-s  Salim Ali visit this place and knew about its biodiversity.
Class was in the outside of doormitory.So we can see paradise fly catcher and Malabar grey horn bill on the branches of trees.
At night Jey sir lectured us on the jobs in the forest department.
                         Last day of the camp we went to see inter pretation centre.We also see Medicinal plants garden and some animals .
Concluding cerymony is inagurated by Sugathan sir. At last all of us got  tree saplings .       
                        ''We go to forest not merely to see wild animals.
                          Such journeys should be for imbibing the wild
                          and free feeling of wilderness''
   This quoting is absalutely correct in the view of our trip.

Travel

JALDAPARA WILDLIFE SANCTUARY-Where mother nature unfolds

Posted by DEEPJYOTI on November 25, 2011

 
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welcome!!
ENTRANCE TO JALDAPRA W.S

Thursday, 24 November 2011

Where it all begun

My trip to jaldapara wildlife sanctuary was debut in forest and wildlife tours. And it was certainly the one I would remember for years to come. We took the best way possible to reach JWS through train. We went to NEW JALPAIGURU from where we took the train to MADARIHAT, a small village that serves as the gateway to JWS. One can even opt for other routes as their are various via roads and rails.


By noon we reached MADARIHAT and a car picked us up and went to HOLLONG FOREST LODGE inside the JWS core forest area. The tourist lodge is rarely available and it is to be booked atleast a 120 days before to reserve it. But people can opt for other hotels also that is present in MADARIHAT.
After a delicios lunch we got ready for our evening forest safari in a jeep.

Our first destination was HARINDANGA WATCH TOWER. From the watch tower there is a beautiful view of the spanning forest. But to our luck we couldn't spot any animals from there. Disappointed we left and continued out ride to JALDAPARA WATCH TOWER.

En route to their quiet a lot peacocks and peahens can be sighted moving around along the road. Keeping our eyes open we moved on and got our rewards when we spotted a herd of GAUR. Indian wild buffaloes , bigger in size to their african counter part. The gaurs are mainly black in color with milky white coverings from their knees to hoof and their big horns. Looked like they were wearing caps and sock. Moving in herd it was quiet a bit far from our jeep still we managed a good glimpse.
Finally we arrived at jaldapara watch tower from which a good view of barking deer nibbling in the field could be seen. Timid and shy creature it is and any movement made by us alerted it as a result always kept a safe distance from the watch tower.
Finally it was dark a bit at dusk and we started off for HOLLONG. Our final resting place for the night. A stay at hollong for the night is as good as the safari as the natives of the forest come together in the front view of the lodge deep at night. Salt pits are put to feed the animals which are in requirement for animals to in take minerals. These attract the animals at the night and they are visible from the windows of the room. A great night to be experienced.
 At dawn try to avail the first of the elephant trips to get more chances of viewing the animals. We did so and got lucky. KUNKI meaning female tamed elephants take four at once to visit inside the green. It is a ride to remember cause it gets you up-close and personal with the forest. The tension and excitement is captured best on the ride.

The ride takes you to true core forest area where sometimes the light does not enter. The leafs of the plants and its other parts often touch you and feels like serpent crawling on you. After a while we reached the grassland where mother nature revealed its secret and we were blessed to see the ONE HORNED RHINOCEROS native to INDIA. Elephants get you as close as 10 yards to them as rhinos are generally well behaved animals provided you don't agitate them.
An average of 2 - 3 rhinos are visible to every tourist, far less than KAZIRANGA in ASSAM though. It is due to the total size of JWS is one-eighth of the kaziranga. Moving ahead with our trip we caught a glance of SAMBAR, big and strong hervivores. Presence of those animal proved that bengal tiger is also available but rarest to be spotted.

We were content to find the diverse variety of flora and fauna and my jungle experience was really great. I promised I shall return in the green soon. And most luckily mother nature rewarded us with the icing on the cake. From a 50 yards out we could spot a animal which is so popular to us, the most successful of  all killer cats. THE INDIAN LEOPARD. Resting and tanning its skin in the morning sun it rested on the ground.
And after sometimes it started having its breakfast from a kill it had last night. That was the probability, as said by our mahut. But we continued to click pictures of it from a good distance as time came to halt. It was a lifetime view.

After the wonderful , once in a light year jungle ride we were back at our HOLLONG and at noon we bid adieu to the JWS catching train back to NJP via madarihat.

 
I enjoyed being in mother nature's lap and now i frequently visit. You should too. It wont dishearten you if you keep faith in her. Run to her as soon as possible. :)



Corporates and Environment

Himalyan watershed Project

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 31, 2011

 
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The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has registered the Himachal Pradesh Mid-Himalayan Watershed Project for carbon credits.

The Himalayan Watershed Project will thus accrue millions of carbon credits which will benefit about 5,000 families from remote and backward villages in the state, receiving revenue for the next 20 years from the World Bank for providing green cover to 4,000 hectare barren land area falling in 10 districts.

"The project is estimated to generate carbon revenue of at least Rs 20 crore to the communities and individual land holders for the first crediting period of 20 years, which is a strong incentive to protect forest cover," RK Kapoor, Chief Project Director of the programme, said.

This is the first experiment of its kind in getting participation of local people in the conservation and protection of environment. The villagers will be paid 90 per cent of the revenue the state government gets by selling to the World Bank the carbon credits resulting from sequestration of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide through afforestation.


Read full report at the link

http://www.igovernment.in/



Books

Golden Jubilee birth anniversary of Naresh Kadyan

Posted by Naresh Kadyan on October 25, 2011

 
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http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/317549_10150419419074954_589664953_10480766_1736457746_n.jpg
http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/s720x720/309530_10150419418764954_589664953_10480764_461078290_n.jpg

Where as Gandhian Ideologist, philosopher and socialreformer Naresh Kadyan, founder Chairman of the People for Animals (PFA)Haryana – www.pfaharyana.in ,representing United Nations affiliated the International Organisation forAnimal Protection - OIPA in India – www.oipa.org needs  recognition in the animal rights and their welfare read with Wildlife conservationcategory.


Naresh Kadyan, C-38, Rose Apartment, sector-14, Prashant Vihar, Rohini, Delhi -110085 was born on 10th October, 1961 in village Siwana, now in JhajjarDistrict of Haryana, he is a Master Trainer of the Animal Welfare Board ofIndia, had been Nodal Inspecting Authority for Haryana and adjoining areas ofRajasthan of the Animal Welfare Division (Govt. of India), Nominee of theCPCSEA, Masters in Journalism and Mass Communication along with Post GraduateDiploma in J&MC, Diploma in Footwear Technology along with Advance course with‘Distinction’ as well, elected as Member of the Clothing and FootwearInstitute, London on November 8th, 1988. He had been a reporter forthe ‘Jagiriti’, a journal of the Khadi and Village Industries Commission –KVIC.

Naresh Kadyan have successfully organized many blooddonation, eye donation, plantation, awareness about social evils like dowry, honourkillings, illiteracy, infants marriage, killing of female child etc. , he hasbeen elected three time state President of the Haryana Khadi Board EmployeesUnion and founder Secretary General, National Khadi and Village IndustriesBoard Employees Federation (An apex body of all India’s KVIB Employees Unions).He has arranged blood donation camp on January 30th, 1996 with the HaryanaKhadi and Village Industries Board at Manimajra, Chandigarh and then on October2nd, 1996 with District Administration, Gurgaon followed by another on October2nd, 1997.

Naresh Kadyan is a first complainant under the Right toInformation Act, 2005 as he has moved complaint on 19-10-2005 and compiled abook on animal related laws in Hindi.

Naresh Kadyan have been Duty Magistrateduring prohibition policy in Haryana and at present he is working as a DistrictKhadi and Village Industries Officer at Faridabad, during his service as manyas 9 times he was transferred, many times charge sheeted for animal rights andtheir welfare activities, counter criminal case was registered against NareshKadyan in Nawab Pataudi black buck hunting case, since 2000 onwards annualincrement was with held for no reasons.
Animals are being abused during transportation and Naresh Kadyan moved campaignin all over India, maximum FIR's were lodged against offenders and animals wererescued, then Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment (Govt. of India) madea documentary on live raids in midnight at Bahadurgarh. Naresh Kadyan compileda book in Hindi on the animal related laws in India. The National DairyResearch Institute, Karnal injecting Oxytocin injections for lactation on theBuffaloes but Naresh Kadyan lodged FIR against animal abuse because it was acrime as per section 12 of the PCA Act, 1960 then he moved public interestlitigation before High Court at Chandigarh. A special cattle train was caughtby Naresh Kadyan on 10th December, 2000 for the violation of the animal relatedlegislation's, banned oxytocin was recovered which were injected in  5boogies 65 cows for lactation and these all accused were punished by theconcerned court at Faridabad, similar special cattle train of 40 boogies wasalso stopped for the violation of animal related laws, FIR was lodged with theGRP, Gaziabad on 28th December, 2000 and the Allahabad High court upheld theobjections raised by Naresh Kadyan, animals were rescued, handed over to the localanimal shelters. Border Security Force - BSF also shifting camels in a cruelmanner from Rajasthan to Delhi for Republic parade but this animal abuse wasexposed by Naresh Kadyan, in Jammu and Kashmir horses were abused at Katra thenNaresh Kadyan moved first complaint on 19th October, 2005 under Right toInformation Act, 2005 raising this issue because due to special status state asper the Constitution of India, Indian animal related laws are not enforced overthere. Sheep's and Goats are being abused under Indian Army supply cover butNaresh Kadyan exposed this crime against animals as well. The Govt. of Indiamade out rules for slaughter hoses in 2001 and these rules were implemented byNaresh Kadyan lodging FIR against illegal slaughter houses in Ballabgarh(Faridabad). Conchs and corals are also banned in India; Naresh Kadyan foundthese articles in Kurukshetra, Mathura, Haridwar and legal actions have beeninitiated.
He has contributed a lot and a man behind rehabilitation of the performinganimals like lion, bear, panther, monkey and bear, due to his efforts alldancing bears are now out from the Indian roads and streets because heintroduced a scheme for rehabilitation of kalandher along with their performinganimals like monkey and bear, later this scheme was successfully implemented bythe Wildlife SOS and Wildlife Trust of India, more than 600 dancing bearsrescued and no one left to perform in captivity. He has rescued many dancingbears from the Kalanders, lodged FIR with the Police Station, Sonipat,Salhawas, Gurgaon, Faridabad (Haryana) and Shalimar Bagh in Delhi. He played akey role to rescue 29 performing lions and a bear from the Russian Komal circusfrom Palwal in Haryana, Asiad circus from Dehradun, Amar circus from Karnal,laxmi female sick elephant was also rescued from Dhand in Kaithal and same wasshifted to Delhi Zoo, which was died later, Apollo circus at Meerut, Westerncircus at Gurgaon. He has contributed with the ZEE News to rescue African lionNarsinhma from a farm house of Muzaffar Nagar, this lion belongs to Asiancircus and Naresh Kadyan lodged a complaint against this circus while stationedat Gurgaon, owner ran away along with two lions and cub from Gurgaon, bothlions were died at farm house and cub Narsinhma became adult, same was rescuedand rehabilitated in rescue center at Nahar Garh, Jaipur after lodging FIRagainst offenders with Dalanwala Police station.
Naresh Kadyan, a whistle blower of former captain of Indian cricket team MansurAli Khan Pataudi black buck hunting along with two hares in 2005, he took thecarcass for postmortem cum identification of species to Delhi zoo and he isfaces criminal proceedings for his strong activism. Animal Welfare Board ofIndia - AWBI recognized his work declaring Star of the month, later he stronglyopposed accused bail in the High Court at Chandigarh and raised thejurisdiction issue and get trial shifted from Jhajjar to Special Environmentcourt at Faridabad. A black buck and Chinkara was illegally captured by the AirForce Station, Sirsa officials and make unrecognized mini zoo with in the AirForce station premises but Naresh Kadyan moved complaint, both animals wererescued and rehabilitated at Deer park, Hissar. The Chief Wild Life Warden ofHaryana failed to take legal action then he filed a complaint before SpecialEnvironment Court at Kurukshetra, like wise a black buck was hunted in Udmivillage of Panipat, FIR was lodged and when due to politically pressureAdministration moved to cancel the case but Naresh Kadyan moved complaint inthis case as well before the Special Environment Court at Kurukshetra. A blackbuck was also found in the captivity of a Chairman, Haryana TourismCorporation's residence at Dharuheda but same was also rescued andrehabilitated in Rohtak zoo by Naresh Kadyan, due to this strong activismNaresh Kadyan was harassed by then Haryana Govt. A black buck was captured bythe officials of Wildlife science faculty of Aligarh Muslim University, samewas rescued by the UP Wildlife Department with out any legal action againstoffenders but Naresh Kadyan lodged FIR No. 491 dated 9th July, 2011 againstfive officials of the faculty as well. Elephant polo was held at Jaipur in 2006but Naresh Kadyan raised the issue and then moved public interest litigation aboutelephant abuse, Rajasthan High Court - Jaipur Bench banned the operation ofIron Ankush on the PIL moved by him. Chimpanzee was abused in the feature filmJanseen, Elephants in Jodha Akbar, horses in Drona and all these issues wereraised by Naresh Kadyan.
Mongoose is a protected wild animal but people used its hair paint brushes.Naresh Kadyan moved a campaign in India for awareness and many legal actionswere initiated like huge mongoose hairs along with paint brushes were recoveredfrom Ambala Cantt, Gurgaon, Bhiwani, Faridabad, Ballabgarh, Narnaul, Rewari,Bahadurgarh in Haryana, Jahangirpuri in Delhi and in Hyderabad, where as thisproject was sponsored by the Wildlife Trust of India.
Leopards are being killed due to conflict between human beings with the wildanimals, leopards were killed at Jind, Karnal, Mewat, Faridabad, one was badlybeaten in Mewat another was illegally captured by a farm house owner in Gurgaonbut all these issues were raised by Naresh Kadyan. Many online petitionssuccessfully operated to get support of local and International communities,due to his strong campaigning peacock feathers trade was proposed to be banned,the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 and the Wild Life ProtectionAct, 1972 draft bills were prepared for replacement of PCA Act, 1960 with theAnimal Welfare Act, 2011 and to amend the WP Act, 1972. Adoption of Zoo animalsin Haryana scheme was introduced by the Chief Wild Life Warden and motivationcampaign was initiated by Naresh Kadyan at his own. Elephants can be openlytraded from the official cattle fairs but Naresh Kadyan raised his voice foramendment in the concerned legislation. He has recovered 30,000 plastic Indianflag before Independence day in Delhi then mobile fast to get ban on Elephantpolo in Jaipur, same was canceled by the Carlsberg beer, in past Naresh Kadyanmoved PIL against Cartier Elephant polo in 2006 and Iron Ankush was banned bythe Rajasthan High Court (Jaipur Bench). Presently he is campaigning to get ban on meat export and illegal animalslaughtering in Gazipur Slaughter house in Delhi by Allana’s, Cancelation ofWhite Tiger inbreeding in Madhya Pradesh, Where as concerned officials arebacking it for profit and tourism promotion. Campaigning for food, water andtreatment for Tripoli Zoo animals in Libya during war, Campaign against FactoryFarming in India, FIR has been lodged with the Madhuban Police station againstRabbit farm and owners were hold guilty, punished as per legal provisions bythe local court,  moved petition beforethe Chief Election Commissioner of India for freezing the Elephant symbol ofBSP. Complaint against Jumbo Circus has been lodged by Naresh Kadyan to rescueblind hippo and docked tail dogs, feathers chopped birds, illegal cats, abusedhorses, camels and elephants.
Raised his voice against the National DairyResearch Institute – NDRI, CentralBoard of Excise and Customs, Income Tax Department, Delhi State Rifle Association,Haryana Public Service Commission, State Government of Himachal Pradesh, TamilNadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Haryana Police, Punjab Police, Gujarat Police, AssamPolice, Goa Police, Tamil Nadu Police, Delhi Police, Manipur Police, KolkataPolice, Karnataka State Police, Bangalore City Police, Rajasthan Police, UttarPradesh Police, Madhya Pradesh Police, Indian Ordnance Factories (Ministry ofDefense) and Mizoram Legislative Assembly, which insulting the National Emblemof India, where as Haryana Police comes forward to remove the errors afterNaresh Kadyan complaint. HE the Governor of Tripura breach the agreement andviolated the set procedure, guidelines of the Government of India being anPadama Shri awardees but Naresh Kadyan taken up this matter as well, he hasfurther raised his voice about the rank of the Indian Police, Para MilitaryForces along with the Indian Army because their badges also don’t haveSatyameva Jayate.
Naresh Kadyan also successfully campaignagainst the attack on Indian students in Australia, radio-tagging scoresof Indian students duped by a "sham" university in California, castlesreservation cover for all communities based on financial status, removal ofLord Ganesha image from the Indica beer / Goddess Laxmi image from non-vegetarianburger / Vests, spread peace and harmony after terrorist attack on Mumbai26/11, awareness campaigning about Ram Setu, Yamuna, Taj Mahal, Sparrows,Vultures and holy Ganga with the full support of International communities, heis the man behind getting approved of the pension benefits scheme to theHaryana Khadi and Village Industries Board employees. Many Internationalcommunities recommended Naresh Kadyan, to be a political voice for animals inthe Indian Parliament, beg Padama awards for him.
Main PIL’s moved by Naresh Kadyan on thefollowing issues:

1.     Ban onunbranded eatables.

2.     Removalsof encroachments from Gram Panchyat lands.

3.     Appointmentof Lokayukta in Haryana.

4.     Appointmentsof consumer form members.

5.     NHRC petitionsduring Kadyan Sangwan khap disputes.

6.     Marriagedispute between Kadyan Lohan khap matters.

7.     SatluzYamuna Link Canal – SYL matter.

8.     Ban onsame gotra marriages.

9.     Amendmentsin the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960.

10.                        Ban on peacockfeathers trade.

11.                        Ban on elephant poloand iron ankush.

12.                       Ban on misuse of oxytocin injections on milking animals for lactations.

13.                        Langur abused to keepaway common monkey.

14.                        Oxytocin injectionswere operated on Buffaloes for lactation, FIR was lodged, PIL moved.

15.                        Whistle blower inNawab Pataudi black buck hunting and Miss Soha Ali Khan arms license matter wasexposed.

16.                        Wildlife Trophies declarationmatter.

17.                        First RTI petitionmoved on October 19, 2005.

18.                        Legislation forexotic animals and birds Emu and Rabbits.

19.                        Cruel cameltransportation by the BSF.

20.                        Two special cattletrains were stopped, offenders booked with in 15 days, December 10, 2000 withGRP, Faridabad and December 28, 2000 with GRP, Gaziabad.

21.                        Introduction ofrehabilitation schemes for kalanders and dancing bears

22.                        Vest and bullet proofjacket for Police dogs and their rehabilitation after their retirement.

23.                        Introduction oflegislation for camel, elephant’s transportation / Dog breeders, pet shops andfish aquariums.

24.                        PETA, WTI and GurgaonDistrict Administration awards.

25.                        Ban on illegalslaughter houses, moved PIL in the Supreme Court of India for ban on cowslaughtering during bakir Eid.

26.                        Ban on joy rides oncamel and elephants.

27.                        The Ministry ofSocial Justice and Empowerments make documentary on cruel transportations ofanimals live raids by Naresh Kadyan.

28.                        Exposed cruel sheepand goat shifting under India Army supply cover from Delhi to J&K.

29.                        Leopard killing inFaridabad, FIR was lodged and complaint has been moved in the SpecialEnvironment court at Faridabad.

30.                        Successfully runningambulances and shelter for animals in distress.

31.                        Dogs have rights tobark, rules for pet shops, dog breeders and fish aquariums / Ban Quail farming.

32.                        Removal allobjectionable material from the internet about our beloved leader Smt. IndiraGandhi spread by the so called Khalistani’s.

33.                        Constitution of HumanRights Commission in Haryana.

34.                        Blind Hippo, dockedtail dogs abused by the Jumbo Circus but due to Naresh Kadyan campaigningabused animals were rescued and rehabilitated.

Naresh Kadyan earn Internationalrecognition and credibility, to know more about his work, his name may kindlybe searched at any search engine at internet, you can find his images as well.He has managed many PIL’s and online petitions, as he has spent 25 years activeservice for mankind, animals, wildlife and society as well.

 

Wildlife , Forest Laws

Blind Hippo in Indian ‘Jumbo Circus’ Needs Help! - Abhishek Kadyan

Posted by Naresh Kadyan on October 24, 2011

 
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A blind hippo called 'Raja' in India is in trouble and needs your help.The hippo, along with other animals, are being abused in an Indian Circus called “JumboCircus.”  Both the hippos’ teeth eyes need immediate veterinary treatment. The animal was found without care ina congested box with dirty water and with no space for exercise or movement during the visit of the Delhi Zoo Veterinarian, he was deputed by the Central Zoo Authority of India on the complaint lodged by the founder Chairman of the People for Animals (PFA) Haryana Naresh Kadyan, Master Trainer to the Animal Welfare Board of India, representing OIPA in India, Whenconfronted by Naresh Kadyan, the Manager of the circus sent him away and hewas not allowed to be present during the Veterinarian inspection, where as Miss Sukanya Kadyan, Director Events of the OIPA in India demanding that a Medical Board should be constituted at once to inspect all performing animals including eye, teeth surgeon, representative of the AWBI / CZA / WCCB along with the representatives of the NGO's In additionto the hippo, Kadyan saw exotic birds performing without any records, which requiresinvestigation by the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau. He also saw cats and dogsinbreeding, which goes against government legislation, docking tails of a dog is an offense but Jumbo circus have many docked tail dogs to perform, where as AWBI registered these dogs as performing animals, which needs attention, cancellation as well. Elephants are being abused by the iron ankush during performance but use of iron ankush is banned by the Rajasthan High Court (Jaipur Bench), order passed on the public interest litigation no. 8987 of 2006 moved by Naresh Kadyan during Elephant polo sponsored by the Cartier and Elephant family.


Kadyan from OIPA hasfiled grievances with the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau (Government of India),Animal Welfare Board of India, Central Zoo Authority of India, Chief Wildlife Wardenof Haryana, the District Administration, the President of India’s Secretariat andthe Government of Haryana and is currently awaiting action from these entities. He has contacted them regarding theblatant violations of the Prevention ofCruelty to Animals Act, 1960 / CITES and the WildlifeProtection Act, 1972 made by Jumbo Circus.  Kadyan has requested the confiscation of allof these animals after legal action is taken against Jumbo Circus.


OIPA is asking that concerned animal advocates around theworld sign a petition to the Indian authorities demanding that action be taken againthe Managing Partners of Jumbo Circus for the violations of these Acts.Specifically, the petition states:


“Whereas Jumbo circus have many docked tails dogs, unregistered cats, Camels, horses, Elephants andblind hippo to perform, so all these animals may kindly be rescued and FIRagainst owners of the Jumbo circus stationed at Panipat in Haryana, adjoin g area of the National capital, may be lodged for theviolation of the section 3, 11, 38 of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act,1960 read with the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and 428-429 IPC. PFA Haryana–www.pfaharyana.in is ready to rehabilitate all rescued animals during courttrials.”


Please help by signing the petition,and adding a personal comment to your signature. For more information about OIPA in India, visit their website, as well as Peoplefor Animals (PFA) Haryana


Little Known Destinations

Magical beauty of forest

Posted by abhirami on October 21, 2011

 
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Last week I went to Periyar tiger reserve,Idukki in Kerala.I got a chance to participate in the statelevel quiz compitetion which belongs to the wildlife week celebrations.
The quiz competition was on 8 october.Kerala Forest,sports,cinema minister K.B.GANESH KUMAR inagurate the function.It is really a new experience to me.
                     We had started our journey from Unniyal,Palakkad.We went to Kumily through Vagamon route.Vagmon is a beutifull place which have green meadows.When we reach Kumily
we got lovely welcome from forest officers.Next day we went to Tekkady lake and watch the magical beauty of forest.We saw Malabar Giant Squirell and bonnet monkey in the forest.
Evening,we went to chellar kovil medu,where we can see the majesty of western ghats.In the route from Kumily to Kambam(Tamil nadu)there is a piece of protected forest area.
That dense forest's mysterious beauty make us attract in to it.
                     Next day morning,we left Kumily and went back through Ramachal Medu,Painavu,Idukki.We passed Idukki wild life sanctury in our way.Anyway,this journey helps me
to realise the beauty of forest.

Wildlife Poaching

Panna’s poaching nexus exposed

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 19, 2011

 
Forum Post
"Staff of the tiger reserve worked hand in glove with poachers, while the state government kept its eyes tightly shut..."

Read the full shocking report which appeared in "Down To Earth" October 2011 issue at the following link
http://downtoearth.org.in/content/panna-s-poaching-nexus-exposed

Little Known Destinations

north India Birding Tour With Ghani

Posted by Ghanshyam singh (Ghani) on October 17, 2011

 
Forum Post

Unexpected India 2010: Haryana and Uttar Pradesh with Ghani(GS)

 

Introduction:

 

Where

From 2nd to 18th April 2010 myself and seven friends were engaged on a superbly successful birding trip around Assam and Arunachal Pradesh in the very capable hands of James Eaton of Birdtour Asia (www.birdtourasia.com). Full details of this trip are available as a report on the Birdtour Asia Website.

 

After leaving Assam, four of us were due to transit via Delhi before continuing back to the UK, however Eyjafjallajökull Volcano had other plans and the now infamous ash cloud meant that we suddenly had a week to kill in the vicinity of Delhi. Our hastily planned route took us first to Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary for the chance to catch up with Sind Sparrow, and then up into the Himalayan Foothills of Naini Tal, Sat Tal, Pangot, Ramnagar and Corbett.

 

When

The Naini Tal area is traditionally a winter destination and we knew that our spring visit would miss various key seasonal species which winter at lower elevations in the Himalayas. This proved to be the case, however several Long-billed Thrushes were still lingering and summering Spot-winged Starlings had arrived. More importantly, Rufous-chinned Laughing-Thrush appeared on cue and both Koklass and Cheer Pheasants performed magnificently.

 

It is interesting to note that ‘Birdquest’ missed both of the latter species in December 2009, so a Spring visit would certainly seem to bring certain advantages. Hopefully this short report will provide an insight into what the Himalayan Foothills have to offer in a brief April visit.

 

 

Daily Diary:

 

Sunday 18th April

Prior to our departure from Assam, news of the Icelandic volcano and the disruption to West European travel had already started to filter through, however it was not until we reached Delhi that the full magnitude of the situation became apparent. As soon as we knew that our British Airways flight to Heathrow on April 19th was cancelled we put plans into place to visit Sultanpur Jheels early the next morning.

 

The unexpected opportunity to visit Sultanpur provided a second bite of a cherry which had been cruelly denied to us the previous December. At our last attempt delayed flights meant that we only had half an hour at this excellent site after travelling up from Nagpur, and we saw the range-restricted Sind Sparrow slip through our fingers as the daylight faded.

 

Monday 19th April

At 05.00 a very smart air-conditioned minibus awaits Andy Deighton, Martin Flack, Andy Bunting and myself, outside the Star Hotel. It is an hour-and-a-half drive to Sultanpur Jheels, which is actually in the adjacent Haryana State, and Guide(GS)  with a good knowledge of the area is essential.

Fortunately our man is suitably clued up and soon the ‘Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary’ signs start to appear. At the leafy Sanctuary car park , the local guide to whom we have been introduced just four months previously. GS informs us that our target Sind Sparrow is actually present and breeding, but outside the reserve. A ten kilometre ride to the south therefore delivers us to Basi, an area of arable land and sewage ponds where we while away the next two hours with some great birding.

 

Initially our walk takes us through recently harvested cereal fields, where we are thankful that the temperature is still relatively cool under a low, hazy sun. An early success is a group of 7 migrant Red-headed Buntings, with males sporting full rufous-fronted breeding regalia. Breeding plumaged Red Avadavats and smart Black Francolins add to the excitement of this unexpected morning of birding in a total different environment from that enjoyed during our previous two week’s travels. Ashy-crowned Finch-Larks, Oriental Skylarks and Tawny Pipits feed beside the track, while Booted and Indian Reed Warblers forage in the bushes, and Grey Francolins scamper through the dry fields.

 

In the adjacent sewage ponds Black-winged Stilts wade, as large flocks of Ruff wheel above and Wood Sandpipers ‘chiff’ excitedly. Small numbers of Temminck’s Stink and Black-tailed Godwits feed in the newly flooded paddies, as half-a-dozen Black-naped Ibis and several Greater Flamingos work the sewage pond shallows, all adding up to quite an impressive spectacle.

 

Our goal, however, is the Sind Sparrow, a somewhat enigmatic species whose very restricted range that has recently extended south from the Indus Floodplains. It doesn’t take long for Sanjay to locate a pair of the subtle Passers, which are feeding young in an unseen nest at the best of a dense bush overhanging the sewage canal. Patience allows the study this close ally of the House Sparrow, and ultimately delivers some close photographic opportunities.

 

Next we travel back to Sultanpur, though we miss out the reserve and concentrate on the dry land behind, where a pair each of Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse and stately Sarus Cranes are soon located. It takes a more determined search, below a fierce mid-morning sun, before we secure our final target in the form of three magnificent Indian Coursers.

 

 

Our driver is Bola, who proves to be superbly competent at the wheel of his immaculate Toyota Innova, even in the face of the total mayhem which is Delhi’s rush-hour traffic. A storm of marble-sized hail stones is a shock to both us and Delhi’s local commuters, and seems incredible in the near-fifty-degree heat.

 

After leaving the sprawling capital we make more rapid progress on good roads, with a sunset stop at the Ganges breaking our journey and providing an incredibly atmospheric evening spectacle across India’s most sacred river. Dozens of bathers gather in the shallows, where floating tea lights bob downstream on the slow current. Further down the bank several funeral pyres flicker in the dimming, misty light, flanked by large gatherings of mourners; this really is a true taste of Indian life and provides one of the most vivid and moving visions of our travels.

 

It is dark before we begin to climb into the foothills, where the cereal fields give way to roadside forest. It takes a full seven hours from Delhi to reach the Sat Tal , a wonderful high altitude sanctuary where we will spend the next two nights. A superb meal awaits us, then we rapidly retire to the wonderfully cool luxury tented accommodation which could not contrast more greatly with the sweaty Star Hotel where we have spent the previous night.

 

Tuesday 20th April

After an appetising early breakfast we set off down the road which leads to Sat Tal Lake. At 1400m the temperature under the clear sky is reminiscent of a summer’s day in the UK, as we work our way through bird-laden pines and deciduous woodland. Orange-headed Thrush, Grey-winged Blackbird and Blue-capped Rock-Thrush get us started, along with Green-backed, Grey and Black-throated Tits and some stunningly close views of the gorgeous Black-headed Jays which are garden birds here.

 

Grey-hooded and Greenish Warblers are the common Phylloscs, while Streaked Laughing-Thrushes, Grey Treepies and Plum-headed Parakeets are all plentiful. Scaly-bellied and Brown-fronted Woodpeckers feed in the trees, and Bar-tailed Treecreepers spiral up mossy trunks. The appearance of a pair of Spot-winged Starlings, nectaring in a flowering tree, is a source of great excitement, as this east-to-west Himalayan migrant is a tick for all.

 

Wedge-tailed Green Pigeon, Long-tailed Minivet, Asian Brown and Blue-throated Flycatchers, Slaty-headed Parakeet, Tickell’s Thrush and Striated Prinia all add up to a memorable couple of hours in close proximity to the Lodge. Mid-morning our bird guide appears, in the shape of GS. Over the next week Ghani as he becomes known, proves to be both a first class bird-finder and a great companion, with his Himalayan experience proving invaluable.

 

Descending towards the lake, new species continue to appear thick-and-fast in what can only be described as a phenomenally bird-rich area. Speckled Piculet, Western Crowned Warbler, Black-lored Tit and Ashy Bulbul are noted, along with the very distinctive bispecularis race of Eurasian Jay with its plain crown and lack of white wing patch. Striated, White-crested and White-throated Laughing-Thrushes are all seen, but the stars are a pair of stunning Rufous-chinned Laughing-Thrushes; unbelievably they are our eighteenth species of laughing-thrush of this extended trip.

 

Sulphur-bellied and Tickell’s Leaf-Warblers, Red-billed Blue Magpie, a showy Scaly-breasted Wren-Babbler and a magnificent roosting Brown Wood Owl end a superb morning of Western Himalayan birding. Coincidentally, we have all independently visited the area up to twenty years previously, but things really seem to have changed; I don’t remember it being this birdy last time around!

 

After a fine lunch at the Lodge we travel the short distance down to Kachi Temple, a scenic if somewhat bizarre spot in the pine-clad hills, beside a beautiful babbling stream. Here a gaudily painted Hindu Temple blasts out a relentless ‘Hare Krishna’ chant, and has attracted a small attendant throng of white western would-be Hindus!

 

The crossing point to the temple affords spectacularly close views of Plumbeous and White-capped Redstarts, as well as an obliging pair of Crested Kingfishers. Our goal does not materialise, however, and we set off down the stream without a Long-billed Thrush, fearing that it has already departed its wintering haunt. Brown Dipper and a superb Spotted Forktail conclude the afternoon, then it’s back to the Lodge via a session in the local PCOs (telephone call boxes), to find out the latest flight and volcano gossip.

 

Wednesday 21st April

Our 05.30 breakfast is a positive lie-in after the NE India regime, then it’s back down to Kachi Temple to sample the latest Hare Krishna soundtrack. The birding is much a repeat of the previous evening, and we are about to leave when an exciting Ghani appears, waving his arms frantically and offering an exaggerated ‘long-bill’ gesticulation! It can mean only one thing, and a short sprint soon has us peering down onto one of the best thrushes there is. Resembling something of a weird amalgamation of thrush, terrestrial babbler and curlew, the incredible beast rummages through the bank-side litter just a few metres below us, allowing exceptional views of this normally shy species.

 

The rest of our time in the valley produces the standard fare of Crested Kingfisher, Spotted Forktail, Striated Prinia, Booted Warbler and Steppe Eagle. Then we set off to the west and our next destination of Pangot, via a visit to Naini Tal for the internet and telephones. This really is a trip down memory lane, as the thriving hill resort was our main base when we were last here in the early 1990s, and the famous boating late and its surrounds bring back many happy recollections.

 

Beyond the bustle of Naini Tal, we ascend further into a much more rural setting, where the tiny hamlet of Pangot sits between oak forest and terraced fields, at the head of a beautiful valley. After settling into our excellent chalet accommodation at the Jungle Lore Birding Lodge, and feasting on yet another superb meal, we are back in the field, this time for a steady downhill walk amongst the magnificent scenery of the Bagar Valley.

 

Afternoon birds include Black Francolin, many dazzling Blue-capped Rock-Thrushes, Striated Prinias, White-capped Bunting, Common Rosefinches, Greenish, Sulphur-bellied, Hume’s Leaf and Blyth’s Reed Warblers. The calls of Indian, Common and Oriental Cuckoos all echo down the valleys, along with those of our old friend from Arunachal Pradesh, Common Hill Partridge. It certainly isn’t the best time of year to bird this area, as the wintering specialities have departed to their high altitude breeding grounds and summer visitors to this elevation are somewhat thin on the ground, but it really is a spectacular setting in which to wander and we return for our evening cuisine in a very contented frame of mind.

 

Back at the chalet a small but menacing black scorpion has climbed the wall amongst the conglomeration of moths which are attracted to the lights. After coaxing him into a more photogenic pose we all make a mental note to check our boots for unwelcome visitors in the morning!

 

Thursday 22nd April

With pheasants firmly in our sights we eat early and set off towards the village of Vinyak, situated at an altitude of around 2300m. As we pass extensive work-in-progress, to pave the narrow track which winds through the mixed forest, the chances of catching up with a roadside pheasant seem to grow remote. Chestnut-crowned Laughing-Thrush, Himalayan Pied Woodpecker and a reunion with the Whiskered Yuhinas are all welcome, a pair of Kaleej Pheasants faintly raises hopes, and then the sudden appearance of a displaying Koklass Pheasants within a few metres of the track causes excitement within the car to reach new bounds.

 

Over the next twenty minutes, skilful manoeuvring of the car and even more skilful manoeuvring of cameras, scopes and bodies within the vehicular hide secure some mouth-watering footage of a pair of magnificent Koklass Pheasants, as the male repeatedly calls from his chosen low perch. Having secured one pheasant target, the remainder of the morning is spent scouring the nearby steep grassy slopes for Cheer Pheasant, an even more sought-after Galliform confined to the Western Himalayas.

 

Himalayan Griffon Vultures and Lammergiers keep us entertained with spectacular fly-pasts, and streaky Upland Pipits perform song flights from rocky pinnacles, but the Cheer Pheasants fail to materialise before we retire for lunch in the heat of the day. The afternoon birding session consists of a similar bout of scanning, as we all slowly become more and more intimate with every pheasant-shaped tussock and crag on the vast sloping hillside.

 

The certain highlight of the evening is the appearance of a magnificent Yellow-throated Martin, which proceeds to bound through the sparse grassland below us, possibly in search of a gamebird supper. We return to the Lodge where the day has one more surprise in store, for AD at least. Today the old chap is fifty, and to add to the ‘Birthday Pheasant’ he has already received, the staff roll out a fine birthday cake, complete with iced name and candles!

 

Friday 23rd April

Today we are at the Vinyak Cheer Pheasant site to see the sun rise, in order to maximise the chances of connecting with our last remaining target bird. We have only just stepped out of the car at the allotted viewpoint when Ghani exclaims that he has a pair of Cheer Pheasants! Even more amazing is the fact that they are not on a distant slope as we had expected, but literally right next to the road just a few hundred metres back towards the village. They are in fact so close that Ghani dashes back to prevent them escaping uphill and away, while several of us sprint off in pursuit, before cameras blaze in honour of these absolutely stunning birds.

 

For five minutes we soak up every intricate plumage detail as the pair scamper through the sparse brown grass and over the loose rocks just metres below us, before they lose patience of all the attention and launch into a glide path which takes them way down the valley; simply stunning.

 

A Chestnut-bellied Rock-Thrush is the only other notebook entry for the early morning, before we return for a final scrumptious breakfast at the lodge. Here we also take the opportunity to capture some of the incredibly photogenic occupants of the terraced gardens, such as Black-headed Jay, Streaked Laughing-Thrush, Russet Sparrow and Tickell’s Leaf-Warbler.

 

The rest of the morning is taken up in the descent to the lower altitude sites where we will spend the remainder of our stay. As we pass Naini Tal some entertainment is had with the long brass telescopes available for hire to scan the distant Himalayas, as we ponder how many Rupees we can amass by doing the same with our Kowas and Swarovskis!

 

It is already very hot by the time we arrive at the Kosi River Barrage below Ramnagar Town, yet another site with many fond memories from previous trips, this time of Ibisbills, Wallcreepers and chronic food poisoning! Although such wintering species are long gone by April, Streak-throated Swallows are nesting on the barrage, Ruddy Shelduck loaf on the river and a pair of Painted Snipe shelter from the heat at the water’s edge.

 

After checking in at the superb Tarangi Lodge, where our chalet accommodation overlooks the Kosi River, we head upstream to check for roosting Tawny Fish-Owls. The owls are more reliable in the winter months and cannot be located, but Large-tailed Nightjar, Common Hawk Cuckoo and a surprise Long-billed Thrush all oblige.

 

With an afternoon game drive booked it’s soon time to return to our hotel, where an open-backed jeep awaits to whiz us off to Corbett Tiger Reserve. Entering via the Bijarani Gate we follow a rough track through a mixture dry Sal Forest and open grassland, notching up a fine selection of birds and mammals as we drive. Jungle Babbler, Indian Grey Hornbill, Jungle Owlet and Collared Falconet are all welcome trip ticks, while Red Muntjac, Cheetal, Sambar and Asian Elephant help fill up our scant remaining camera memory card space. Black Stork, Chestnut-shouldered Petronia, Crested Bunting, Black Francolin and some superbly-plumages Peacocks round off the listing, along with a Indian Grey Mongoose, as we make our way out of the park.

 

The restaurant at Tarangi Lodge conjures up what has to be the finest cuisine of a trip notable for its culinary excellence, providing a fitting end to a very memorable day.

 

Saturday 24th April

This morning’s dawn game drive is to commence at Corbett’s Jhirna Gate, a forty-five minute drive from the hotel. The habitat is a familiar mixture of Sal and grassland, but this area is reputedly the best for finding Tiger and the multitude of fresh prints which litter the dusty dirt roads are certainly testament to a healthy population. Eyes remain glued to every bend in the road, willing an encounter with the stripy head of the forest food-chain, but our luck has clearly been exhausted on pheasants.

 

Fresh Sloth Bear tracks are also seen, but we have to be content with the usual variety of deer, another Indian Grey Mongoose, along with Indian Golden Oriole, Himalayan Flameback, White-rumped Shama, Puff-throated Babbler, Bay-backed Shrike and Brahmany Myna. Particularly memorable are the highly photogenic colony of gorgeous Blue-tailed Bee-Eaters which are busily digging holes right next to the track. Booted Eagle and White-rumped Vulture pad out the raptor list as we vacate the Park, at which point a bearing fails on our jeep, leaving us to limp to a village chai stall to await a replacement. Things could be much worse however, as we sip fine massala chai, whilst photographing the local Plum-headed Parakeets, Wrynecks, Indian Rollers and Blyth’s Reed Warblers.

 

Eventually we are rescued for a late brunch at Tarangi, with the remainder of the day being spent up river in the company of Brown Fish-Owls, White-browed Wagtails, Chestnut-tailed Starlings and Brown Dippers, beside the tranquil boulder-strewn flanks of the Kosi River.

 

Sunday 25th April

With few options left to play out the final morning of our extended trip, Ghani suggests a trip to Ramganger, a rural resort on the higher reaches of the Kosi River. Our morning walk at this scenic spot commences by crossing the impressive suspension bridge, before following a track high above the winding course of the river. Birding is rather uneventful, until we eventually pull the desired Lesser Fish Eagle out of the bag, and AD gets his final raptor fix of the trip!

 

A return to Tarangi sees up dining, packing our bags and warmly thanking the Ghani(GS) for making our unexpected trip extension such a success. Then it’s just a matter of seven hours in the car and we are back at Delhi Airport, where thankfully BA have our names on four spare seats.

 

The ‘Eyjafjallajökull Extension’ has been a remarkable success, and special thanks must certainly be extended to GS, who ensured that everything ran smoothly in spite having virtually no advance warning of our arrival.And Ghani proved to be a first class guide and turned into a personal friend through the course of our travels, whilst Balraj was a chauffeur par excellence! We would certainly recommend Ghani(GS), without hesitation, to anyone planning future travels anywhere on the North INDIA.

 

It could be said that every ash cloud does have a silver lining!

 

Ian Merrill                                                                                                                      May 2010 i.merrill@btopenworld.com                   http://uk.geocities.com/i.merrill@btopenworld.com/default.htm

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