Wildlife , Forest Laws

What can we do to save our environment

Posted by yuvneet on November 06, 2010

 
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Its so important to stop burning remains of crops still 95% of our farmers burn there remains which produce CO2 and causes maximum damage to our environment ......these gases deposits in upper region of atmosphere and damage maximum crops ....and forest diversities 
So please stop these peoples to burn all such things these are destroying our forests and wild animals too

Bio-Diversity

Vulture consrvation

Posted by Dr. Dau Lal Bohra on November 02, 2010

 
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Activities to save the vulture's,Jorbeer, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Populations of three Vulture species, White-rumped Vulture (Gyps bengalensis), Slender-billed Vulture (Gyps tenuirostris) and the Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus)have suffered large decreases across the wold. Poisoningthrough consumption of carcasses that have previously been treated withthe veterinary drug Diclofenac has led to large population declines.The main threat to vultures in India  is diclo,since numbers of largewild ungulate species that constitute the mainsource of food forvultures are relatively low. A vulture restaurant isthe provision of adomestic animal carcass (a cow is the most usualspecies) to vultures atan appropriate site within their range.

Alternative feeding management of Gyps Vulture for migratory species in North West Rajasthan, India
(Vulture Safe Zones – Vulture Restaurants)

Necessary to conserve vulture’s migratory root


Currenttime focus on vulture conservation in North West Rajasthan especiallyBikaner region is very important. This is very sensitive area regardingto bird conservation, but in governmental policy focusing only suchsite their vulture population took place all the year example- nearNational park, wild life conservation area and other places. Butregarding the vulture migration is also the very big problem formonitoring and conservation aspects. South Asia is very important areafor vulture migration, so alternative feeding management is necessaryfor rest Gyps vulture’s and their conservation. In year 1999 to 2009,lot of Rs utilized for vulture conservation by Government and NGO’sbody, but in last 10 year no big changes for vulture population andtheir relevant area.

Importance of Alternative feeding management
Manyscientists suggest for decline of vulture population to change climaticand behavioral mode including roosting and feeding site. But reallyfood changing is the major factor for decline, So Alternative feedingmanagement system is very helpful for regarding conservation. Manytheories given by research paper but in ground level this is the notpossible and it’s very costly. So presenting this particular mode offeeding management is helpful for protection.

Treats of feeding managements

Vultureshave performed important ecological, traditional and aestheticfunctions throughout the Indian subcontinent.  In Vulture conservationprogram Indian government make up very sensitive and important issuebut in ground level they were worked not properly as If VeterinaryDiclofenac Ban by Government they people were used unspecified brand orHuman Diclofenac (Generic) for animal treatment. In many places poisonsuse for dead animal protection from vultures or carnivorous birdsspecies but they poison work against for environment. In Present timegovernment made many protocol for vulture conservation specially policyto recover the particular 3 endangered species but although mean timeIndian Griffon is also reduced in number. If don’t take any action bygovernment or NGO’s they show same scenario as OWBV’s position, soneeded to change protocol for migratory vultures program from allworking agencies. Historically, many factors have been responsible forlocal vulture declines particularly poisoning and persecution. Thedeclines in India result from elevated adult and juvenile mortality,and low breeding success. The widespread and rapid pattern of declines,i.e. in all areas irrespective of habitat or protection status suggestthat persecution through shooting or poisoning, whilst important at alocal scale, are unlikely to have caused the declines.  Theepidemiology of the declines is best explained by the introduction andwidespread use (i.e. nationwide) of a contaminant, or an infectiousdisease.

Available safe meat for vultures (activities to save the vulture in the Jorbeer, Bikaner)
Providing the safe meat (diclofenac and other poison’s free animal)for vulture feeding as alternative method for migratory species. Theyprefer which animals from the areas where dairy farmers usually avoiddiclofenac their large cattle and utilize Meloxicam or other painkillerof treatment.

Other activity
1.    Provide Diclofenac-free food to vultures in a secure and undisturbed location.
2.   Create awareness among local inhabitants about the need to conservevultures through publications and          education programmes.
3.    Work with veterinarians to prevent the use and diversion of human Diclofenac for treatment of cattle.
4.    Regular vulture census in the region.

E-Governance for Conservation

Need to conserve water to save wildlife-listen to an audio clip

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 29, 2010

 
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Need to conserve water to save wildlife and stop desertification-Listen to an audio clip by clicking on the link.

Mansoor Khan from Bilaspur is talking about the need of wildlife conservation. He says water is the most important link for it. We need to save water. If we allow the rain water to flow to sea and continue to take out ground water at such a speed then we are inviting deserts. We need to stop cutting of trees. If you want to save tiger then you will also have to save sambar, its prey, he says, who is dependent on trees and entire nature and environment.


http://cgnetswara.org/index.php?id=1840

National Parks

mudumalai national park

Posted by thirumal ram on October 18, 2010

 
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i have visited the mudumalai national park in Nilgris of tamilnadu
on the way in to the forest i have watched man extinct species of birds and other mammals such as
indian gaur ,elephant with their calves and many spotted deers with a group of nearly100-150
i have also spotted an extinct species named sambar
while we r on return i spotted two tigers  fighting with a common sloth bear
that looked so awesome so dont fail to visit mudumalai the nilgris

Any other

Environmental News and Information

Posted by Neil on October 09, 2010

 
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EcoEarth.Info is a one of a kind Environment Portal - with genuine
Internet search, cutting biocentric commentary, social network &
constant news and link tracking - all dedicated to achieving global
environmental sustainability

You may access EcoEarth at: www.EcoEarth.Info

You might also be interested in seeing New Earth Rising a

biocentric e-zine dedicated to knowing Earth's crises, to pursue social change and personal transformation sufficient to achieve global ecological sustainability.

New Earth Rising may be found at: http://www.newearthrising.org/

Bio-Diversity

Stopping a Mass Extinction

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 07, 2010

 
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......We, Homo sapiens, are an inextricable part of this complex web of life. It’s both presumptuous and silly to ask what biodiversity does for us—a little like asking what the rest of the body and organs do for the bones...............

We don’t, and never will, actually understand all the intricacies of this complex web. Rigorous scientific research has given us many insights, among the most powerful being that the more biodiverse a system, the more stable it is. .........

Read the whole article at
http://www.livemint.com/2010/10/06222637/Stopping-a-mass-extinction.html

Little Known Destinations

Purna WildLife Sanctuary

Posted by Palak Thakor on September 13, 2010

 
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      I live in Surat City which is 130 Kms away from Purna Wildlife Sanctuary.I many time visit that place just to observe the changes in the biodiversity of the forest.I am going there since last 4 years once every two months.Now a days the NGO workers around the Forest area means from Surat & Navsari visit that places every Sunday just to watch night life of jungle.On seeing their regularly visit in particular area i saw quite changes in biodiversity of that area.There were Leopards, Hyenas & Wild Boars were found in that area but due to the Constant interference of the NGOs in that area now leopards & Hyenas are spotted less & quantity of the wild boar increased.

    Even forest Dept are not stopping NGO workers to come 7 stay in that area.Even they Catch the snakes from there & bring them to Surat to show them to others 7 then release that snake in outskirts
of Surat & which is a different habitat from the natural area needed for the survival of that snake.I had told them to mend their ways but they are doing it & Forest dept doesn't say anything to them as they are paid money for not taking steps against them.

    What can be done now?The Nature savior are destroying it.

Little Known Destinations

Trip to Pangot.Near Nainital,Uttarakhand

Posted by KAAJAL DASGUPTA on September 02, 2010

 
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I visited Pangot on 27th August 2010 to capture some shots of the Himalayan species which are available in plenty in this area.I reached the place at around 7.30 pm and stayed at Janardan cottage which is located atop a small hillock at the zero point crossing.The time is not right for birdwatching as it is raining heavily in North India this year including the hills of Uttarakhand but the proximity of this place from my city (Bareilly)made me impatient!
Next morning I woke up to find that it is raining but around 7.30 am it cleared up and I set out to look for the birds.There are two roads ,one leading high up to the mountains (To Vinayak) and one down to the valleys.
Some famous birding resorts like Jungle Lore is situated at the lower road .
On my trek to the top I could watch Yellow Naped Woodpecker ,Yellow cheeked Tit,Black headed jay,White throated laughing thrush,Blue Whistling thrush , Nuthatch and Eurasian jay.
after breakfast while scouting the valley side I spotted Streaked thrush ,Grey tit,Oriental dove,Himalayan Bulbul,Yellow breasted green finch,spotted munia,blue drongo,sparrows,black headed tit,prinia,brown fonted woodpecker,lesser spotted woodpecker and many other small birds which could not be identified.
I will go back in winter to spot the Khalij pheasant ,Koklass and other Himalayan varieties.
It rained every now and then till evening but I managed to click many shots.

General

Relive a Earth full of Life

Posted by Relivearth on August 25, 2010

 
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There was a planet full of diversified lively species abiding by all natural laws. A planet of peace where only nature ruled. But the days are gone. The planet is now becoming home to only one species swiping out all other poor species. The intelligent species has challenged every natural laws, spread across every corner of this planet, killing and burning each and every other species. it is cleaning up and consuming every natural resources so fast that the poor planet will shortly have hardly anything to supply this species. With a population about 7 billion and growing at unstopping rate every moment,  it is nothing but Human species and the planet is our lovely earth. Humans are growing every second at such a faster rate that many of the species have total of less individuals compared to number of human births every secs. We are at war with Nature and there is none to stop us. It's only our intelligence that can show us the right path and save the whole planet along with us. It is high time to generate awareness among everyone about those species fighting for extinctions, places that are facing threats due to pollutions. We should start learning the importance other lives and beauty of Nature. Relivearth is such an effort to help anyone to bring any species, places to front line and create awareness. Then why don't you join this movement?

Eco-tour

Taman Negara

Posted by Anjan K das on August 20, 2010

 
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Occupying a huge swath of territory in the centre of Malaysia is one of the world’s largest areas of protected rain forest. This is the Taman Negara (Malaysian for “ National Park”). It occupies 4343 sq km of land spread over three states, Kelantan, Pahang and Terengannu. It is claimed that the landscape here has remained unchanged for the past 130 million years, event eh recurrent Ice Ages made no impression on it. Originally named after King George V, it received its new name after independence.
We approached Taman Negara from Kuala Lumpur driving east past the Genting Highlands. Later we left the tolled Highway system to enter the “Normal Highway”, not fenced off, with crossings regulated by traffic lights and still at least four lanes. No highway in this country has even a passing resemblance to ours in West Bengal.
We stopped for lunch in Jerantut, where we had the most marvelous lunch at a Chinese restaurant. Even here in the heart of Malaysia, all the workers were from Indonesia. I talked briefly to one of them using our driver, Mahendran as an interpreter. She had arrived just the day before, referred by an agent from her home village who had sent workers here earlier. She expected to earn at least three times what she earned at home and be able to send money home. Her situation is the same as ours, at just another level!
From Jerantut, the road became a little more quiet, traffic thinned down. Small patches of jungle appeared, giving us a brief idea of what lay in wait. Once Mahendran had to break sharply to avoid running over a water monitor which was about to cross the road. This is a familiar figure from the Bengal countryside, though not so common nowadays. We soon turned into a smaller two lane road. Now the jungle began to close in, interspersed by plantations. After about 4 hours driving we were at the Kuala Tahan. This is one of the principal entry points to the National Park and here the road ends. You have to cross the Tahan River to enter the forest proper.
Standing on its banks we began to get an idea of what Malaysia must have been like before the advent of the Europeans. The local population now called the Orang Asli were the sole inhabitants of these jungles, sharing their space with tigers, the Sumatran rhino, Malayan Gaur and the Elephant. Even today small number of these large predators adnd their prey persist together with uncountable numbers and species of birds, smaller animals and a profusion of reptiles and insects in numbers that boggle the imagination.
We crossed the river to our resort. The Mutiara resort is on the other side of the river adjacent to the forest. There are lovely chalets, with all the mod cons and if you leave the compound you are immediately engulfed by the forest which lies adjacent ready to devour these puny creations at the earliest opportunity. We were here; at other entry points it is possible to go for long treks as well as to climb the highest peak in Peninsular Malaysia, Gunung Tahan.
The resort organizes all sorts of activities; these included a jungle night walk. It is extremely thrilling to walk along the jungle trails, seeing myriad forms of wildlife, mainly insects and snakes, sambar deer and something I did not know existed, a mushroom that glows in the dark! We ended with a marvelous dinner at their restaurant. Overlooking the Tahan River, this restaurant serves cuisine from all over the world. It is also possible to get a much cheaper meal at restaurants on barges moored on the river, but tonight luxury seemed to be the way to go!
Next day we went for a canopy walk. The world’s longest canopy walk has been constructed a stiff 3 km walk from the resort, its height soaring to 150 feet over the ground. It was a revealing experience as we walked from stage to stage, once coming face to face with a flock of parakeets and then seeing the Tahan river flow muddily into the distance. The trees were unbelievable, their size and girth larger than anything I have ever seen before.
The resort itself is also extremely relaxing. You can simply sit on the verandah watching the world go by, as birds flit through the trees that dot the campus. That is what Susmita did, refusing to tramp through the sweaty rain forest. We saw among others, a pair of racket tailed drongos, one of my favourite birds.
We had only the weekend there, but it is ideally suited for a long stay, when you can sit and watch the birds, walk the trails and raft lazily down the river. Staying here gave us an insight to why it is that rainforests are best approached from the river. Trying to force a way through the undergrowth is madness .It is also dangerous, It is much more comfortable to approach deep into it by Nature’s highways and that is what many tourists do. We have done the same in many occasions in the Sunderbans.
We drove back even faster, in about three hours. As we entered the lights and traffic of Kuala Lumpur, it seemed a dream that just three hours away, the primeval forest lay, ready to awe us as it has our ancestors throughout human history.
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