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Any other > Our Ngo Janahit bahu uddeshiya gramin vikas sanstha, Telang Takali affiliated to Nisarg Mitra Manch
Posted by Swapnil Bomenwar on November 14, 2014

 Janahit bahu uddeshiya gramin vikas sanstha, Telang Takali affiliated to  Nisarg Mitra Manch, Pandharkawada from 4 years we have worked on slogan of "Protection of water,land & forest" we one devoted for the protection 

      in yavatmal districts there is one villege Tipeshwar sanctury. in that to survival all animals, plants & other activity done by theme.

       we have to plant the plant & also we have to survive it. by celebrating Environmental Day, Welfare day, forest & life weekend , world water day earth day etc.we have to celebrates all these days by surviving forest & to have to spread to all villages to survive forest by all means.

       to deny the problems of environment, we have eco friend ganesha, eco friend dipawali, environment news paper are also giving to our villages friends. in cities & towns many posters are also there for survival of environment.

Eco-tour > Eco Tourism Consultant Needed
Posted by Narotam on September 18, 2014

Hi All

We are working on a wildlife resort in one of the national parks in North India, and looking for some one who can manage the complete operations for the property (viz. Accommodation & Activity  Management) IN THE MOST ECO-FRIENDLY WAY. It is one of the Best forests in India. If interested, Please call on 9999 456 589


PS: We are in the process of acquiring hence can not mention the details of the properties on a public forum. 

Green Jobs > Eco Tourism Consultant Needed
Posted by Narotam on September 18, 2014

Hi All

We are working on a wildlife resort in one of thenational parks in North India, and looking for some one who can manage thecomplete operations for the property (viz. Accommodation & Activity  Management) IN THE MOST ECO-FRIENDLY WAY. Itis one of the Best forests in India. If interested, Please call on 9999 456 589


PS: We are in the process of acquiring hence can not mention the details of the properties on a public forum. 

Environment Awareness > Botany through Religion
Posted by Rao Vandana Parankusam on September 03, 2014

I am not quite religious. I am new at volunteering for environmental surveys too. And so, the concept (relatively old, yet new to me) of combining religion and environment interested me.

Ganesh Chaturthi was on 29th August this year. The ten day long festival will see its grand last day celebrations on 8th September. The ritual of bidding farewell to the lord’s idol by immersing in water bodies was a subject of great environmental discussions and led to amendments of laws and rituals. Strangely, it is this same festival that compelled me to write an article as a novice in this club’s website for totally different environmental issues.

As I went about performing the rituals for Ganesh puja, I realized one serious flaw in my efforts to buy and arrange all the necessary items – I didn’t have the necessary leaves. The recorded on-line prayers rattled off quite a few names of leaves – none of which I had paid attention to earlier. I tearfully remembered my younger days back home when at the end of the pooja the lord’s idol would be almost invisible behind the foliage and flowers – some plucked by us, some bought. Now a day, these leaves are not available even if I was ready to pay. The electric mantras kept naming more leaves and I understood that I had to learn more about them.

I was surprised to know that in all twenty one types of different leaves are used. I am naming them in Sanskrit instead of the botanical names – Shami, Bhringraj, Bilva, Durva, Ber, Datura, Tulasi, Sem,Apamarga, Bhatakataiya, Sindoor, Tej, Agastya, Kaner, Kadali, Arka, Arjuna, Devdar, Marua, Gandari and Ketaki.

One of my mentors – Mr. T.K. Roy told me that if analyzed closely Hindu traditions and religious rituals encourage people to protect the environment. We are religiously forbidden to kill cows, snakes, elephants, and other such animals. We are religiously forbidden to cut certain trees like the Peepal and Banyan, and encouraged to grow plants like Tulsi. It is lovely to view environment conservation through the eyes of religion, and lovelier to look at religion through environment conservation.

As I analyzed, I understood, that in the cities even the trees and plants protected and required by religion are disappearing. Temples are becoming more commercial – popping up at every corner available and even expanding when possible. But none of them make true efforts to plant such a variety of trees and plants. True, it is only the rituals of Lord Ganesh which require so many different leaves, but He is the one prayed to before praying to any other God. On this ten day festival, no stone is left unturned for decorating and making grand pandals. But is that really the need of the hour? Wouldn’t it be logical for once to turn a bit simpler, a bit religious and plant trees in His name rather than build temporary thermocol palaces? We can very well come up with “theme temples” complete with the required plants and trees – or just religiously themed gardens. In the year when REITs is being introduced in India,when commercial real estate is attracting investments, we need to come up with better ideas than just temporary tree plantation drives that rarely have any care takers. Without proper action and awareness, we might have just prayers left as our last resort to survival. Can prayers really help us?

I know that these are just thoughts of a novice. However, it was lovely to learn about the plants and trees I didn’t know earlier just through an old little prayer.

Interlinking of Rivers > Four Rivers evangelists now tight-lipped about disastrous project-Korea
Posted by Susan Sharma on August 13, 2014
"Pervasive algal blooms and invasive bryozoans. Bedrock collapsing from excessive dredging. A mountain of debt for the Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-water). A host of problems are emerging with the Four Major Rivers Project, the massive effort pushed under the administration of former president Lee Myung-bak (2003-08). But the politicians, officials, and experts who pushed for the project, which started out as an idea for a “Grand Korean Waterway,” are showing no sign of regret or reflection.

Most of the major proponents of the project under the Lee administration were tight-lipped or evasive when the Hankyoreh contacted them on July 8 and 9. Some argued for waiting before coming to a final judgment on the project; others argued for channeling even more money into it."

Bio-Diversity > Western Himalayas
Posted by Priyanka Gahlot on July 11, 2014
 Leh -Ladakh , wonderful experience, not a merely tourist spot, heaven for nature lover.

Pangong lake, god's marvelous creation, appearance of waves, clarity of elixir of life, richness of avifauna non forgettable moment of life.

Richness of medicinal plants, tree species, wildlife, makes western himalayan region hotspot of biodiversity. Forest of betula, Juniperus, Deodar, Pinus, Chinar, Maple a very very large green belt ensure we are in safe hands of nature.
Travel > History: Tiger Tourism in Kanha
Posted by Uday on June 21, 2014
Kanha:Conservation

Kanha is World’s finest tiger conservation unit and a National Park. Situated in the cradle of Satpura Range,Kanha National Park is in a part known as Maikal Hills. The forest received early protection during the Raj whence wildlife all over India was on brink of decimation.

Post independence era the park received status of National Park and subsequently it became a Tiger Reserve under the aegis of Project Tiger Program. In earlier times Kanha was a contiguous part of Central Indian Highlands which are now fragmented. The fragmentation came about by conversion of forest into agricultural lands,settlements and denudation.

Tourism at Kanha

In the contemporary era of protected area concept many of the viable ecosystems in the Satpura and Vindhya Ranges have been converted into National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries. The protected areas offer varying degree of protection and seclusion depending upon the status granted.

Since the seventies Kanha National Park is receiving tourists from all over the World. During the seventies the safari was conducted in private cars and the forest staff acted as park guides.Most of the tourism took place in Kanha and Kisli Ranges. Elephant rides were freely available and the tiger sighting was good. This was the era whence the park was recovering from land use and settlements that had been trans-located -leaving few.

The park enclosure had been created for Hard Ground Barasingha and about twenty heads or more where kept inside a place devoid of predators. The rest is history of a highly successful conservation program. There are more than five hundred swamp deer now from a critical figure of sixty six in the seventies.   Some where in nineteen seventy six bison population suffered from an outbreak of rinderpest disease that reduced the numbers subsequently.

In the seventies the major problem for tourism was lack of accommodation and bad highways that lead to the park.There was no hotel in Kanha at that time albeit a canteen sold regular stuff including vegetables did exist. The first accommodation which could be described as basic was established by Kissu Chacha a relative of the canteen owner. I remember the shortage of food stuff at the canteen that nearly marred our excursions in the park.

Bob Wright was the first to establish a hotel in the early eighties. This was then followed by Nilesh Agrawal who established jungle resort with twelve rooms. I began frequenting this hotel during my excursions in the park. The resort went on to be the most successful venture and was later sold for profit around 2012.   Today there are more than 30 hotel resorts in the periphery conforming to all grades.      

Subsequently more rules were incorporated and tiger safari and tourism became well organized. The conservation efforts paid heed and the ecosystem flourished with increase in tiger numbers. Other forms of life also increased in numbers and the populations became stable.

I could see bison and swamp deer inhabiting areas which they vacated due to population decline. This was a welcome comeback and I was thrilled.

Stricter implementation of tourism rules made life much less stressful for the wild denizens and their numbers are constantly increasing to reach the carrying capacity.

The Zones

The park is now divided into four zones for tourism, Kanha being the prime zone. The other zones are Kisli, Sarhi and Mukki. All zones can be entered from Khatia Gate which is reachable from Mandla Township. The number of vehicle entry is now regulated in all four zones except in the buffer where safaris are being conducted. Total area reserved for tourism is 22 percent as per NTCA guidelines.

Kanha Tourism Zone comprises of large grasslands or meadows interspersed with many water bodies and streams. Itis the center of the critical tiger habitat. This area is most frequented by tigress with cubs as the open grasslands provide them with prey and security cover due to high visibility. Other animals sighted here are Leopard, Sloth Bear, Bison, Sambar Deer, Spotted Deer, Langur and Wild Boar.

The zone also contains an interpretation museum and cafeteria and most important of all a well equipped set of toilets for the tourists.

Kisli Zone comprises of rugged hills which are low lying and table top. These hills are covered with dense forests of Sal, Bamboo and Mixed.The hills give rise to deep glens which contain numerous water bodies and perennial streams. These are the lifeline of the ecosystem.  The ecosystem supports tigers, leopards,sloth bear, bison, sambar, wild dog, wild boar, spotted deer and langurs.  The zone encompasses diverse habitats. It offers good sightings of tigers and other animals to tourists on jeep safari.  

Sarhi Zone comprises mixed forests, bamboo along the Sulkum river, and it is the most picturesque as well. This is the best place to seethe tiger besides four horned antelope, Nigai antelope and sambar deer.

Mukki Zone comprises of midsized grasslands and large swampy lakes which are home to the Hard Ground Barasingha.  The low lying region is surrounded by tabletop mountains which are home to many tigers. There is a separate entrance for this zone called Mukki Gate. The zone can also be assessed from Khatia Gate towards Mandla. There are many luxury hotels near the Mukki Gate.       

Buffer Zone Tourism

Kanha Tiger Reserve is divided into two management zones. One is the core zone or the critical tiger habitat while the other is the buffer zone which cushions the core zone. In the core zone no human habitation is allowed while this takes place in between the buffer forests subject to some regulations. The gate fee for excursion in the designated buffer zone is less and there is no limit on the number of vehicle entry.  This is booked by the tourists whence no entry is available in the four prime zones. The buffer zone ride yields sight of many deer and with luck one can see the tiger, leopard, bison and the sloth bear.             

Park Safaris

The park safaris are well organized and conducted by the Kanha Management with some strictures from NTCA or National Tiger Conservation Authority. All safaris are conducted on open jeeps registered with the Kanha Office. There are two safari conducted in a day one s in the morning which begins at predawn and ends at 11 AM. The second one begins at 4.30 AM and ends at 6.30 PM. The safari timings keep on changing as per the day light available.

The entry for park safaris is from the Khatia Gate and the Mukki Gate. The entry is booked in advance albeit on spot booking is also available. Advance booking is done on the MP Online Portal.  The jeeps for safaris are available at the Khatia & Mukki Gate. You can also use the resort jeep if available or request the resort to book one for you. Six guests are allowed to sit for the safari in the park.

The zone is allotted during the time of gate entry booking and the excursion is limited to the allotted zone.All zones have different rates which keep on changing but the guide fee is fixed at Rs.300.00 which has to be paid at the time of entry. It is compulsory to hire a park guide registered with the department. Recently full day safaris have been introduced for which a greater charge has to be paid.

Tiger Tracking & Animal Watching   

This has in recent time become a well developed mechanism. The guides and naturalists are expert at locating tigers using a number of signs that includes alarm cries of the prey species. Their knowledge enhances visitor experience by their interpretation of the ecosystem and morphological descriptions. Some of the naturalists are also good at birding which is very useful for the bird enthusiasts.   

Tiger Show: Elephant Joy Rides

Though joy rides on park elephants are still available tiger show has been banned. It is no more possible to see tigers from elephant back. This recreation is banned in all Central Indian Tiger Reserves. Elephants are also available for filming wildlife at Kanha but this is subject to a set of procedures. 

How to Reach?

Reaching Kanha: From New Delhi& Mumbai by flight to Jabalpur and then drive 165 km.

Best reached From New Delhi &Mumbai by overnight train and then drive 165 km. 

Notes: The Park is closed from Julyto October 16th every year. It is also closed on evening of every Wednesday.    

About The Author

Uday works as freelance naturalist guide for Courtyard House a luxury resort at Kanha National Park. He also organizes and operates Kanha package tours for inbound groups.   Uday loves to write on wildlife safaris and travel in India. 
Eco-tour > Enjoying Wilderness at Kanha National Park Buffer
Posted by Uday on June 18, 2014

My first visit to Kanha was in the seventies whence I saw a beautiful tigress. The tiger reserve lies in the districts of Mandla and Balaghat. The landscape is the most striking feature of Kanha National Park in MP.

As you cross over the Indri Village the picturesque settings begins to enthrall you. The magical paradise appears as patches of forests alongside and table top mountains on far left. The drive encompasses through many tribal hamlets hanging listlessly in a bygone era. The tribal subsist of small fields around the villages which are not at all fit for agriculture. Nevertheless the quaint hamlets are part of the enchanting landscape and it is pleasing to see them around.    

The village bazaars accord life to the sleepy surroundings and the colors are fascinating. Ensembles of modern appendages appear as government offices of local level, dispensaries and schools. Some over bloated kirana shops or general stores supply urban products and food grains. The ever zigzagging rickety buses connect the interiors with Mandla and a larger agglomeration at Jabalpur City.   


As you proceed towards the Mochha village the scenic splendor begins to unfold. You can come across common animals like langur, spotted dear and often the barking deer. Leopards and tigers can appear during the night and so do the sloth bear in the buffer. Even the shy gaur venture out sometimes to the neighboring villages to forage on the fields.  

Mocha is the hub of hotel accommodations on the Khatia Gate. On the way you cross over the Kanhar Rivulet, Ghangar Nala and the Banjar River. These waterways are still ensconced in the prehistoric era with forests on shores laden with stones of dazzling hues and colors.  


The urbanity at Mochha takes you by surprise thanks to a large number of hotels and resorts, tea shops, stores, schools and the governing infrastructure. The accommodations range from budget to star properties that cater to upscale tourists.


During the seventies Moccha was a sleepy little village but no more as tourism grew I could see the transformation.  All the villages in the buffer zone and periphery are engulfed with patches of forests that are home to wild animals and amazing birds.  


The buffer forests offer excellent birding on foot which is a boon for the enthusiastic birders. The place I regularly visit for bird watching is the lake at Boda Chhapri. Along with my guests I  visit this enchanting water body without fail. The stillness of the place and the pristine forests accord tranquility and peace much wanted succor after hectic tiger safaris.     

The village walks washes away the leftover weariness. The small friendly tribal active in their daily routine offer a smoothing experience for those entrapped in the rat race of major towns. 


I work in one of the resorts in Kanha as naturalist and bird guide. This is a rare opportunity of combining work with pleasure. The Courtyard House is surrounded by Kanha Forests, water body and tribal fields. The hamlets are a little distance away. The evening sun downers under the Kanha starry night are often accompanied by the thrilling roar of the resident tiger.  Besides many jungle sounds this is the most exciting event at Courtyard House.     

Photography > Portrait of National Bird
Posted by Akbar Mohammed on June 11, 2014
I have taken this photo in surrounding of Krishna river in Srisailam Nallamala forest.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/akbarphotography/14166072948/
Urban Wildlife > Difference between Organic gardening and Permaculture
Posted by Susan Sharma on April 14, 2014
The Permaculture garden is a lot more than an organic garden.

In permaculture gardens (home systems is the more holistic term) there is rarely bare soil, the conservation of soil and water is a high priority. There is a more complex use of space. Plants are allowed to set seed and are interplanted for pest control. You are unlikely to see plants in rows......

The permaculture system aims to harvest and maximise water, sun and other natural energies, e.g. wind, dust, leaves, bird droppings.
The permaculture system aims to provide nutritious food and habitat for people AND native animals and birds.



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