Forum > Engineers and Environment > Environmental Science: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Posted by Deborah Davis on January 10, 2022

 

According to an article from Assignment Writing Services UK We've met numerous content area and elective teachers who are interested in learning more about environmental science (ES) out of a sense of love and concern for the environment. They also want to pass on their enthusiasm and expertise to their students while remaining true to their instructional focus.

For instance, an English language arts teacher may initiate a project in which students advocate for environmental issues in their community by writing letters to local politicians offering solutions. A social studies teacher can assist students in comprehending the legislative process by examining landmark environmental laws or by demonstrating how state and federal governments collaborate to address issues affecting ecosystems throughout the United States.

As a result, when we set out to write Environmental Science for Grades 6–12: A Project-Based Approach to Solving the Earth's Most Urgent Problems, we set out to create a resource that both ES and non-ES teachers could use to adapt projects that demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of ES while also appealing to a diverse student population.

We recommend that teachers interested in trying their hand at ES have a firm grasp on the purpose of environmental education, which is to investigate environmental issues and work toward solutions while engaging students in projects in which they learn about conservation, create calls to action, collaborate with others, and resolve environmental issues in their communities.

When teachers are planning learning experiences for their students, we recommend that they choose a relevant ES theme and organize their students' learning using three helpful frameworks:

1. Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): A nationally adopted framework for science education that includes content standards but also emphasizes scientific practices and crosscutting concepts that span all four science domains.

2. Academic Social and Emotional Learning Collaborative (CASEL) SEL Integrated Framework: By categorizing students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes into five domains, this framework for social and emotional learning enables students to gain a better understanding of themselves, their environment, and others.

3. Student Standards for the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE): These standards help teachers design learning experiences that help students develop the skills necessary to thrive in a digital world.

Teachers can align with the three frameworks by carefully crafting learning objectives for ES projects organized around a theme that assists students in resolving critical environmental problems. How to do it in two easy steps.

1. CHOOSE AN APPROPRIATE PROJECT THEME

Projects involving ecosystems/ecology, or the study of the interactions between communities of organisms and their physical surroundings, and those that examine human impact on the environment and ways in which harms can be mitigated or prevented, are two good places to start.

Ecosystems: Two of ES's guiding principles are an understanding of the structure and function of ecosystems and the ability to communicate complex scientific concepts in simple terms. Addressing these fundamentals in an ecosystem and communication project can lay a solid foundation for more complex ES research in the future. One excellent way to combine these two concepts is to conduct research into why certain species are endangered, the factors that constrain or disrupt the ecosystem services that may be involved, and what can be done to inspire others to advocate for positive changes. ELA teachers can assist students in developing a compelling call to action that will help them understand the importance of communication in advocacy and engaging others.

Human consequences: The government's role in enforcing environmental laws relates to social studies. The visual arts are connected to scientific illustrations and the design of informative and visually appealing infographics. And the process of managing natural resources and balancing our own society's needs against those of other communities, both human and natural, generates opportunities in a variety of other academic disciplines.

Biodiversity is a concept that serves as a gateway to a variety of other subjects. Students can use mathematics to calculate the rate of depletion of Atlantic cod while honing their reading skills by analyzing excerpts from Mark Kurlansky's book Cod. Students from more urban areas may gain a greater sense of authenticity by analyzing publicly available data on the biodiversity of wildlife in their city parks and then creating infographics illustrating the predator-prey relationships that enable these populations to remain stable. They can use this knowledge to write persuasive pieces arguing for stronger action to protect fish populations or to create short-form infomercials using multimedia technology tools and fine arts skills.

2. APPLY TECHNOLOGY AND SELF-EFFICIENCY SKILLS

Ecosystems and human impact can be connected in a variety of ways to the aforementioned learning frameworks. Students have the opportunity to discover that environmental education does not have to be limited to science class. Here are some considerations for teachers when developing their learning objectives via learning targets.

With standards centered on human sustainability and natural resource management, NGSS is a natural fit for ES. In addition to the NGSS, teachers can utilize the ISTE Standards for Students to assist students in integrating appropriate edtech use across projects. It's also critical to understand that the ISTE standards are not simply about enhancing instruction with technology; they were purposefully written to align with academic subjects. And, given the pervasiveness of computers and apps in our daily lives, the standards benefit learners by preparing them to be global collaborators capable of leveraging technology to solve ES problems in novel ways.

There is an increasing body of research demonstrating the link between the causes and effects of nature experiences and how they can benefit children's learning and social and emotional well-being. The CASEL integrated framework's self-awareness competency is an excellent vehicle for assisting students in comprehending their emotional responses and thereby strengthening their emotional intelligence skills. ES projects can be beneficial in this regard as they navigate their emotional intelligence journey.

Share this post:

Post your Comment


Download IWC Android app     IWC Android app



Copyright © 2001 - 2022 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use

Website developed and managed by Alok Kaushik