Trip Reports
Bird Sanctuaries > Point Calimere
Posted by Mohamed Sheik Ravuthar on February 07, 2007

POINT CALIMERE

M MOHAMED SHEIK RAVUTHAR

Forests and wildlife of Nagapattinam district

  • Point Calimere Wildlife sanctuary with a total protected area of 30 square kms, is home
  • to the largest population of the endemic Blackbuck in south.

Other animals of the sanctuary include the jackal, spotted deer, jungle cat,

feral horses, black napped hare, etc. including a variety of reptiles.

From October to January nearly 90 species of migratory water birds

visit the sanctuary and its surroundings. They include Flamingoes, Painted storks,

Pelicans, Spoonbills, ducks, teals and a variety of shore birds. The best time to visit

the sanctuary for bird watching is November-December. The sanctuary is open to

visitors throughout the year.
 

A Forest Rest House at Kodiakkarai is available for visitors to the sanctuary.

Visitors may contact Wildlife Warden at 04365- 253092 or

Ranger, Kodiakkarai at 04369-272424

 

                  

   Blackbuck- the most important herbivore               

 

 Olive Ridley turtles nests in the sanctuary beach from Jan-March

                                                                   

 

         

              On 14th November, 2000 a 35 ft long Bryde’s whale was rescued
            from mud about    10 km  west of Kodiakkarai. The rescue operation was
            carried out with the active support of district administration. Pic: Top: A full grown    Bryde’s whale. Bottom: Diagram showing padding of whale for towing during rescue.
The sanctuary is now declared
as a Ramsar site
 
 
Sanctuary vegetation
 
Tropical dry-evergreen forest covers nearly 15 sq.kms of Pt. Calimere Wildlife sanctuary. The forests are mostly of the nature of scrubland that stands on low sand dunes located on the western half of the sanctuary. Manilkara hexandra, locally called Palai is the most important evergreen species of the sanctuary forest. In the sanctuary grasslands the dominant
graminoid is Aeluropus lagopoides followed by Sporobulu tremulus and Cressa cretica. The forest is home to 154 species of medicinal plants
like Mucuna pruriens, Solanum trilobatum, Tinospora cordifolia Randia dumatorum and Cissus quadrangularis
 
                       

 
National Parks > Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai
Posted by Susan Sharma on January 14, 2007

Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai-A report

By Sushant Sharma, Member, IndianWildlifeClub.com
sushant01@hotmail.com

After reading about the plight of Borivili (East) hills, Mumbai, I decided to visit the West side of Borivili Hills whch is also known as Sanjay Gandhi National Park. The park is described as the Green Lung of Mumbai and treks and trails criss cross the park.

At the gate we were told that there is no arrangement for any kind of transport to Kanheri caves. We can walk if we wish. And walk we did. The trails along the monorail track were littered with waste and human excreta. We had to watch each step. But soon the overpowering stench was so unbearable that all we wanted to do was return to the clean air of Mumbai.

Here are some pictures of the Park which I took. They tell a story which do not need any words.

Map of SGNP taken from their official site



Houses within the national park



More houses

Next to a heap of trees cut down (by who?), the board with bird pics proclaim

"We also have a right to live and enjoy. We are few in numbers.  Please allow us to survive.  Don't destroy our habitat."

Little Known Destinations > Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary
Posted by Susan Sharma on January 14, 2007


Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary-Home to the Himalayan Monal

The beautiful dancing peacock has been an inspiration to all Indians to aspire for beauty and dignity. On one of my visits to Himachal Pradesh I visited the pheasantry at Sarahan where I saw the other relatives of the peacock-lesser known members of the pheasant family. The Himalayan Monal with the stern and clever look and a rainbow on its tail feathers left a lasting impression.



Both my husband and I are happiest when out in the wilderness and before long we were planning a trip to Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary, in Uttaranchal India, which is the home of the Himalayan Monal.

We travelled by road, driving from Delhi to Rishikesh on the first day. After halting at Rudraprayag, we proceeded the next day to Chopta via Mandal and Gopeshwar. Once in Chopta, you already soak in the mountains of KedarNath Wildlife Sanctuary.




The forests of Kedarnath Sanctuary is the catchment area of Alaknanda River. The forests comprise a Musk Deer Sanctuary and also reserve forests where villages exist, supporting reasonable good forests where one can hear the call of the koklass pheasant and monals early in the morning. Sighting monals is not that easy as these birds are extremely shy and vary of human presence.

From Chopta you can take up the bridle path to Tungnath temple (trek/horse) –about 5 km-and you will flush monal enroute.




The peaks of Kedarnath which can be reached after a 14km trek, transport one to a heightened spiritual experience. It is no wonder that the majority of Indians who trek these mountainous routes or ride up the bridle path are seeking spiritual fulfillment. The peak “Kedarnath” is believed to be the abode of Lord Shiva.




This biological reserve of Kedarnath Wildlife Sancuary is 975 Square Kilometer in area. It is home to a number of endangered animals such as Musk deer, Himalayan tahr, Serow and Pheasants. The sanctuary is part of the Garhwal Himalayas.

The vegetation is diverse and most of the forest types are sub-tropical, temperate, sub alpine and alpine. The undulating terrain ranges from about 1700’( 518m) to 22,901’(6980m).

From Tungnath you could take another bridle path to Shokharkh - a less used path in forests but lots of chances to flush monals and observe them. You will have a good sightings of kalij along the motor road above Mandal and definetly hear Koklass pheasant at Shokharkh.






Photographs by Shashi and Susan Sharma:
From top :
1. Head of Himalayan Monal Pheasant
2. Garhwal Himalayan peaks from Chopta
3. Vegetation of the sanctuary
4. Kedarnath Peaks at sunset
5. Undulating terrains which are monal habitat

(More photographs of Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary appear at
"Wildscapes.net

Category
1 Hindi Trip Reports
2 Marathi Trip Reports
3 Tamil Trip Reports
4 Bengali Trip reports
5 Malayalam Trip Reports
Bird Sanctuaries
Little Known Destinations
National Parks


Copyright © 2001 - 2017 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use