Snakes

Indian Snakes

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 31, 2018

 
Forum Post

Extended Monsoon time is on in many parts of India.  Snakes are found everywhere, whether it is flooded Kerala, waterlogged Gurgaon or our many Green villages. Some avoid them, some kill them yet few think they need to be understood and protected as a species which is essential to keep the web of life intact.  Snakes have territories and there is an environmentally positive reason why they are in your area.  

I would like all IWC members to watch a video we made recently on the topic of Indian Snakes.

Shaleen Attre is a co-founder of indiansnakes.org.  This website has a  comprehensive database of Indian snakes.  The site also gives tips on how to avoid snake bites, who to contact if you find a snake near your home and also where to get to a medical facility nearby with anti venom in case you are bitten by a snake.  

In her talk Shaleen demolishes many myths about snakes and says it is necessary to spread awareness and start talking about snakes if we want these reptiles to claim their place as protected wildlife of India.  

Indian Snakes

Snakes

Romulus Whitaker on Snakes and other Reptiles

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 01, 2018

 
Forum Post






When it comes to snakes, Romulus Whitaker is the last word for the passion and commitment he brings to his life's mission. At the Express Adda in Delhi he responded to all the questions, fears and reservations the common man has when it comes to facing snakes.


He emphasized on the role of parents and teachers in shaping a child's attitude toward snakes.  So this was a conversation with an adult audience, which included many nature lovers and a section of the general public.


 Quote "Especially in a country where we have 50,000 people dying of snake bites every year and many more getting permanently injured by snakes; it’s avoidable. But getting these messages out there, especially to rural India, is not easy. We are a country steeped in misbeliefs, so it gets a little awkward to say that what your grandfather told you is a lie. One has to do it in a much more diplomatic way and get it across to people that snakes are not after us. Snakes are, in fact, very frightened of us."  Romulus Whitaker


Read the detailed report at


https://tinyurl.com/yavtcfv3 


The Session will also be telecast on CNBC TV18 on Sunday, June 3, 1.30 pm.




Snakes

Snake Tongs

Posted by JEETEKNO on April 05, 2016

 
Forum Post

Snake Tongs 36 Inches

SNAKE TONG 36 INCHES. BLUE COLOR.Wide Jaw design.Rubber coated top Jaw.Completely hidden Wire Cable not Exposed.Polished Aluminum Handle and Jaw.Designed to handle Snakes and other Reptiles safely.25 Inches from Handle to Jaw.Stainless Steel Cable.Thicker Aluminum shaft. Wide Jaw for more Humane Handling. The wider jaw covers more surface area unlike the standard jaw tongs which can get in between the ribs. The wider surface area ensures that the jaws wont get in between individual ribs which ensures comfort and safety for the animal, resulting in a much calmer and less agitated animal.Hand Contoured Pistol Grip Handle.Spring Loaded Jaw for precise pressure.The Rubberized top, along with the polished bottom half of the jaws prevent the snake from sliding through. Essentially you can keep the snake in position by applying minimal pressure, which also keeps the animal in a much calmer state.Professional Grade Tongs.This design of tongs is the best technology available on the market for safely handling snakes humanely.BLUE Colored Tube.

Visit www.jeetekno.com

http://www.jeetekno.com

Snakes

What to do in case of snake-bite

Posted by Susan Sharma on January 27, 2014

 
Forum Post
First Aid

It is important to remember that snakes don't bite out of whim.  They are usually forced to bite.   Venom has evolved as a mechanism to subdue prey and snakes need to conserve their venom for that purpose.  Most snake-bites happen when the snake is accidentally provoked.  In some cases (getting more frequent these days), the victim has simply asked for it.  

If you find yourself in a snake-bite situation, simple protocol and presence of mind could save the victim's limb or even life.

Firstly Things Not to Do:

  • Never try to suck out the venom
  • Never make an incision
  • Never go to traditional healers or try home remedies
  • Do not tie tourniques or use ice
  • Never clean out or tamper with the site of the bite
  • Never try and catch the snake or kill it

All the above actions do not work and often cause more damage than good.

Here are things you should do:

  • Make sure the victim and others are a safe distance away from the snake and try to memorise its appearance
  • Stay CALM and in control.  Take charge of the situation and reassure the victim
  • Remove watches, rings, bangles and anything else that will become constrictive if the wound causes swelling
  • Try to immobilise the victim.  Never let him/her run and only allow him/her to walk if unavoidable.
  • In case of neuro-toxic bites (Cobras, King Cobras, kraits, coral snakes and sea snakes), pressure immobilization (Sutherland method) with long crepe or other stretchy bandage(5-10 cm wide, several rolls) and splint to be applied immediately to the bitten limb, starting at the digits and working up to the groin or armpit.  
  • Do not waste time trying to get any elaborate first-aid done.
  • Get to a hospital as soon as is safely possible.
  • Note the time of the bite and the progression of any visible symptoms.
  • Give the doctor details of the bite and symptoms.

Anti snake venom serum is the only proven cure for venomous snake-bite.
 

Snake-bite prevention

As the popular saying goes prevention is better than cure.

  • Take care when clearing vegetation, raking dry leaves in your garden.  Supervise kids in the outdoors, especially in a green neighbourhood.
  • Use torch/flashlight in the night and wear shoes while going out.  Check shoes before wearing them.
  • Watch your step and see before you sit.
  • Keep your backyard free of junk and make sure your solid waste is managed properly.
  • If you see a snake, do nothing.  Let it go.  Do not try to pick it up or kill it.  If a snake has entered your premises, call professional snake rescuers.
Snake-bite is painful and extremely risky.

Snakes

Common Snakes of Bangladesh

Posted by Shihan rahman on May 30, 2013

 
Forum Post

Snakes are dangerous-beautifulanimal. Most of the people kill snakes recklessly. When they see it, but thetruth is not real as in case of Bangladesh, because more or less 115 species ofsnakes are found only in one order Serpentes including 7 Families, where numberof venomous species are 15 and rest of the species are non venomous, on theother hand most of the venomous snakes are sea snake, they seem does not aswell equipped to biting a man.

The main snake inhabit area aresituated in the Chittagong Hill tracts region, Sylhet region and Sundarbanregion. Some species also found all over the Bangladesh.

 The common snakes of Bangladesh are as follow

1. Jerdon’s  Blind Snake (Typhlops jerdoni), 2. Striped Keelback (Amphiesma stolatum), 3. Dog-faced Water Snake (Cerberus rynchops), 4. Common Bronzeback Tree Snake (Dendrelophistristis), 5. Indian Rat Snake (Ptyasmucosus), 6. Spectacled / Binocellate Cobra (Naja naja) 7. Banded Sea Snake (Hydrophisfasciatus)

Most of the cases people death bybiting of Binocellate cobra (Naja naja), Common Krait (Bungarus caeruleus ),Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii )this country. Though snake kills people but people kill snakes more than theykill and the present status of snakes in Bangladesh are very much endangered,as a life being they have same right to live in nature. 

The habitat of snakes loss due toincreasing population, sharing habitat, deforestation, urbanization, extendingcrop land and over use of forest.

 

Shihan Rahman

Email: shihanrahman87@gmail.com

Snakes

Snakes of West Bengal

Posted by Shibajee Mitra on March 08, 2013

 
Forum Post
This is a blog to create and generate awareness on snakes of west bengal.
Share this page:



Copyright © 2001 - 2018 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use

Website developed and managed by Alok Kaushik