Interlinking of Rivers

Four Rivers evangelists now tight-lipped about disastrous project-Korea

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 13, 2014

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"Pervasive algal blooms and invasive bryozoans. Bedrock collapsing from excessive dredging. A mountain of debt for the Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-water). A host of problems are emerging with the Four Major Rivers Project, the massive effort pushed under the administration of former president Lee Myung-bak (2003-08). But the politicians, officials, and experts who pushed for the project, which started out as an idea for a “Grand Korean Waterway,” are showing no sign of regret or reflection.

Most of the major proponents of the project under the Lee administration were tight-lipped or evasive when the Hankyoreh contacted them on July 8 and 9. Some argued for waiting before coming to a final judgment on the project; others argued for channeling even more money into it."

Interlinking of Rivers

Supreme Court go-ahead for interlinking rivers

Posted by Susan Sharma on February 28, 2014

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The apex court of India has given the go ahead for the controversial inter-linking river project, seeking to transfer water from surplus to water deficit areas in the country. In its final judgement dated February 27, 2012, a three-member bench, headed by the chief justice of India, expressed the “pious hope of speedy implementation” to bring the project to a success. The project, in the pipeline since 1980, has been touted by the Centre as one solution to a number of problems: making water available for irrigating 35 million hectares; enabling full use of existing irrigation projects; generating power to the tune of 34,000 MW with added benefits, including flood control.
Read full report at
http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/supreme-court-go-ahead-interlinking-rivers

Interlinking of Rivers

Ganga-down to Earth

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on April 18, 2013

Blog
............."The games started. IIT-Roorkee, represented by its Alternative Hydro
Energy Centre, disputed our conclusions. We asked why? No data was
provided on the method of estimation. But hidden in the background
sheets provided by IIT-Roorkee was data from two projects of
hydrological flow used to disprove our figures. We checked. We found to
our shock that figures of flow had been modified; suddenly there was no
water in the river in the first place, so a higher e-flow regime would
naturally mean lower energy generation. We checked again. We found that
even levelised tariff figures had been “changed” from what was provided
earlier to the committee.".....


http://www.downtoearth.org.in/content/training-engineers-not-ganga

Interlinking of Rivers

Panel on linking of rivers

Posted by Susan Sharma on February 28, 2012

Blog
The Supreme Court on Mondaydirected the Centre to constitute a ‘special committee' forthwith for inter-linking of rivers for the benefit of the entire nation.

It said: “The NCAER report clearly opines that the interlinking of river projects will prove fruitful for the nation as a whole and would serve a greater purpose by allowing higher returns from the agricultural sector for the benefit of the entire economy. This would also result in providing varied benefits like control of floods, providing water to [the] drought-prone States, providing water to a larger part of agricultural land and even power generation. Besides … benefits to the country, it will help the countries like Nepal etc., uplifting India's international role. Importantly, they also point to a very important facet of interlinking of rivers, i.e., it may result in reduction of some diseases due to the supply of safe drinking water, and thus serve a greater purpose for humanity.”

Read more at
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/article2937800.ece

Interlinking of Rivers

Ganga River Action plan

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on July 10, 2010

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For the first time, seven Indian Institutes of Technology will prepare a comprehensive river basin management plan for Ganga.

While earlier the Union Ganga River Basin Authority was looking upon international agencies to produce the plan which would include not only a blueprint of the sewage systems along the basin but also the dams that are being planned, the joint bid by IIT swung it in favour of Indian engineers. The river basin plan will aim to have adequate provision for water and energy in the Ganga basin to accommodate the pressures of increased population, urbanization, industrialization and agriculture while ensuring the sanctity of the fundamental aspects of the river system are protected. The twin demands of perennial flow and clean waters would be the two benchmarks to be met.

Read more at
http://iitdalumni.com/NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=97

Interlinking of Rivers

Dams Coming Down in U.S!

Posted by Susan Sharma on January 23, 2008

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Dams Coming Down

 

Two years of closed-door negotiations between farmers, Indian tribes, fishermen, conservation groups and government agencies have resulted in an unprecedented (but very conditional) agreement to remove four hydroelectric dams now operating along an embattled 300-mile stretch of the Klamath River in southern Oregon and northern California. The goal of the dam removal is to restore runs of the now-endangered salmon that were once plentiful in the region and to re-assign contentious water usage rights throughout the region accordingly..............

 ...........................................

 

Though it was once the third-most productive salmon river on the West Coast, the Klamath has suffered over the last several decades as a result of misguided hatchery practices, overfishing, development and the loss of habitat to dams, mining and logging. For the dams to actually be removed, the federal government would have to approve the dam removal plan (and put up the estimated $400 million to cover costs). Then, if dam owner PacifiCorp (a major regional utility) is willing to go along with the plan, the dams could be removed as soon as 2015.

 

 

Source:  http://www.emagazine.com/view/?4054

Interlinking of Rivers

Bihar takes lead in reviving river interlinking project

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 03, 2007

Blog

 

Three years after the Central government virtually abandoned the mega project of inter-linking of rivers, the government of Bihar is coming out with a proposal to link various river basins within the state.

Gujarat, too, is toying with a similar idea. What’s more, Tamil Nadu chief minister M Karunanidhi recently said that the linking of the southern rivers — Godavari, Krishna and Cauvery — could be taken up immediately...............

Satish C Jha, chairman, special task force on Bihar and a member of PM’s Economic Advisory Council, told SundayET that a better understanding with Nepal was key to control flood in the state and also evolve a better system of irrigation................

Former head of the task force on inter-linking of rivers Suresh Prabhu argued that it should be a two-way approach. “What Bihar is doing now is a bottom-up approach. We need that too. Inter-linking of rivers should be done in an intergrated manner involving both augmentation and conservation,” said Mr Prabhu.

Source : http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Bihar_takes_lead_in_reviving_river_inter-linking_project/articleshow/2094715.cms


 

Interlinking of Rivers

Linking of Godavari, Krishna and Cauvery could be taken up

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 23, 2007

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Linking of Godavari, Krishna and Cauvery could be taken up

Linking of Godavari, Krishna and Cauvery could be taken up immediately, The Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Karunanidhi told "The Hindu". 
Apart from being a water scarce state, Tamil Nadu suffered from acute ground water deficiency. 

The National Water Development Agency had already completed a study of the peninsular component of interlinking rivers of India.  Since the study had concluded that it was technically possible and economically viable to transfer water from surplus river basins to deficient ones, it was time that the next step was taken towards interlinking, the CM said.


The Chief Minister wanted the project of interlinking peninsular rivers included and funded as part of the agriculture strategy for the 11th plan. 

Interlinking of Rivers

River dried up by diversion-USA

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 17, 2007

Blog


 Judge declares river dried up by diversion to LA revived


   The city of Los Angeles has sufficiently restored
a stretch of river along the Sierra Nevada it siphoned off decades ago
by aqueduct and no longer has to pay fines of $5,000 a day, a judge
ruled Wednesday.

Inyo County Superior Court Judge Lee Cooper said the city has revived
a 62-mile section of the lower Owens River that was left essentially
dry in 1913 when its flows were diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct.

"I can now officially declare that the lower Owens River is a river,"
Cooper said.

Water was directed back to the riverbed in December, marking a
concession in an infamous water war between Los Angeles and the valley
200 miles north of the city.

Ecologists said the revived river was making a remarkable recovery and
reported seeing birds, fish, and plants in the channel.

The judge had imposed the $5,000 fine per day in July 2005 when he
grew frustrated by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s
long-delayed plan to restore the river.

During a hearing Wednesday, Cooper also approved an agreement between
the DWP, Inyo County officials, residents and environmentalists that
spells out requirements for the city to keep the water flowing. The
judge warned he would impose fines under the deal if the city didn’t
meet its obligations.

"The restoration of the river has been a long-term goal of Inyo County
and we are heartened that river’s recovery is well under way," Jim
Bilyeu, chairman of the county’s board of supervisors, said in a
statement.

Source: U.S. Water News Online, July 2007

 

Interlinking of Rivers

Yamuna River

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 25, 2007

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CSE invites you to a two-day media briefing workshop to understand the condition of India’s rivers, examine existing river cleaning programmes, learn from them, and discuss strategies that could bring our rivers back to life. The Yamuna river will be taken as a representative case. The workshop will bring together river pollution experts, civil society representatives and government officials to debate and demystify key issues.

Date: June 14-15, 2007
Venue: India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Eligibility criteria:
- The workshop is only open to journalists and media professionals
- Seats are limited. We have the resources to support the travel and accommodation of a few candidates on a first-come, first-served basis. Therefore, please apply immediately

To apply, e-mail/fax your resume to:
Shachi Chaturvedi <
shachi@cseindia.org>
Fax:  011-29955879

Last date for applying: June 1, 2007

For more information >>
http://www.cseindia.org/programme/media/yamuna_workshop.htm

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