Bird Sanctuaries

Bandipur - Trails of a Wanderer

Posted by KrishnanKP on January 20, 2012

 
Forum Post
http://kpkrishna.wordpress.com/2011/09/07/trip-report-bandipur-national-park/

Tsunami

Tsunami

Posted by Vinay Rajgure on January 19, 2012

 
Forum Post
A tsunami (plural: tsunamis or tsunami; from Japanese: 津波, lit. "harbor wave";[1] English pronunciation: /suːˈnɑːmi/ soo-nah-mee or /tsuːˈnɑːmi/ tsoo-nah-mee[2]) is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, typically an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.[3]

Travel

uttaranchalforyou.com

Posted by Rahul Rawat on December 25, 2011

 
Forum Post
to make your tour smooth and comfortable, and want to know each and everything about corbett national park (Wild Life) book through the Uttranchal for you, the only best tour and travel manger in Ramnagar the Corbett city. we promise you to the best ever tour in you life. 

General

Nature and today

Posted by shruthi on December 20, 2011

 
Forum Post

               

Nature is a small manifestation of heaven on earth. Every subtle breeze, the roll of thunder rejuvenates and fills us with awe. Science strives to safeguard and use nature without much interference; and Art has striven to appreciate it, for centuries. Both Art and Science together has produced amazing music, in appreciation of nature (Bjork-Biophilia)

 Nature is irreversibly connected to us. Studies of evolution or creationist theories only prove that. And the connection of man with nature ,needs to be embraced and safeguarded.

Without the combination of talents from all fields to protect all that’s left to protect. Natures life blood will cease to flow; if we turned a blind eye to it,today.

Bird Sanctuaries

nose and air polution,bir prevention

Posted by harshal on December 10, 2011

 
Forum Post
when we are go to nal sarovar,they stop car before 2 km because  the reason is noise and air polution prevention...but after that there are auto riksa for go to ..nalsarovar...that riksa are more noisy and poluted....why they are doing so....i don't understand the reason,,,

Wild Elephants

Elephant fence in Malawi

Posted by chinku on December 09, 2011

 
Forum Post

A 12 km stretch of solar-powered electric fencing has already been erected along the eastern boundary of  the Thuma Forest Reserve to avoid deadly confrontations between local farmers and marauding elephants.

However, confrontations  continue south of the already established fence and the community is appealing to urgently extend the elephant-proof fence for another 24 km.

This fence will not only save the community crop losses from elephant raids but also protect the Thuma elephant population from angry farmers.  Please support us to finance the next stretch of fence to protect both people and elephants.

Climate change and Global Warming

SUNDERBANS: submerging islands

Posted by rohit on December 01, 2011

 
Forum Post
PLIGHT FOR INHABITANTS 
A study by WWF named VOICES OF CHANGE interviewed many people from Sundarbans and Laddakh  regarding changes they have observed during their life time  in their surroundings and climate.
In Sundarbans, the most common and generalised problem was the erosion of the islands  foot by foot as they are pushed more in land to prevent their fields from infertility bestowed by sea water that too for many coming years .
Few older chaps from the community recalls with fear in their eyes those horrible when their homes been swept away by sea waters, instead of having embankments with good enough height.
REASON : In early days , these embankments used to be entangled with the vegetation around them(mangroves) which gave support to them , which today as a result of habitat degradation and deforestation  by the people themselves for preparing agricultural fields are completely gone and these naked embankments are as week as deck of cards and standing just for name sake.

In the recent years many new embankments have been made after repeated collapsing but because of lack of that man groove vegetative support , people are erecting them to collapse once more.

A NEW STUDY GIVING STARTLING RESULTS
Queen’s University, Belfast, and Institute of Environment Studies & Wetland Management (IESWM)  researchers are going to give a new dimension to the climate related concerns in sundarbans.
They postulate that uninhabited islands are higher in level than inhabited islands. They support this fact by the observation that in inhabited islands the embankments prevent the sea waters form coming in and hence their is no new sedimentation over the islands where as in uninhabited islands they are abundant CREEKS and no restrictive embankments so facilitating sedimentation. 
Now this study group is planing to take on radiocarbon study of sediments deep in soil to find out the rate of sedimentation and then comparing it to rate of rise in sea level to find out  that is this sedimentation really competingwith  the sea level rise and thereby have prevented the uninhabited islands from inundation and submerging .
If this goes in favor the hypothesis then the researchers would go upto advice that we can depopulate the islands to help them survive the rising sea level.

Bird Sanctuaries

To the wonderful world of birds

Posted by niranjana. on November 30, 2011

 
Forum Post
 Thattekkad bird sanctury is a very important bird sanctury in kerala situated in Eranakulam district.
Our nature camp in 2011-2012 is to here which is known by the name of Salim Ali.
                                 On 17th November our team(26 students & 5 teachers) started the journey at 9 am.At 11 am we see 
kerala kalamandalam and reached thattekkad at 3.30 pm.One nature camp is not only the trekking.It has many levels.
Fist level is inaguration.We are very lucky to that we got Dr.R.Sugathan sir to inagurate our camp.He worked 16 years
with Salim Ali.
                               Our first duty is self discribtion.All said about their name,house,hoby,ambition and for what we have came to thattekkad.
Next camp convenor Sivadasan sir divided us into three groups.First group SALIM ALI wanted to write about five birds .
Second group(including me) HORN BILL  got trees and third group CEYLON FROGMOUTH got medicinal plants.
After dinner first day ended.
                              Next day morning at 8.00 am our trekking started.First our eyes stukked at the trees and plants.
Next at the birds.To watch birds,we divided to two batches.First team(including me) reached on the top of a rock.
10-20 hill maina flied three times around us.It was an amazing scene.
                     There are four type hornbills.We see Malabar grey horn bill(Ocyceros griseus) on the top of a tree.We can see the changes 
arond that we endered to semi ever green forest.We can see the very rare bird ceylon frogmouth.Ceylon frogmouth!
It wondered all of us.It has the color of dry leafs.We can only see malabar giant squirell in animals.But we are very lucky 
that we can see many birds including hornbill,Rose winged parakeet,Grackle,Emaraled dove,Oriole,Paradise fly catcher.
In the way,we reached a watc tower.But it is not very taller.We can see the mysterious beauty of forest in around of the watch tower.
                          In the bank of periyar we can see the pugmark of porcupine.After a 15 minutes walk we reched the top 
of a hill.We can see the bridge near our doormitory.We can see Munnar hills in one side and Malayatoor hills in the other side.
Truely it is a 'view point'.then we walk through a teak plantation.At 1.00 pm we reached doormitory.After the lunch,it is time to
talk with Dr.Sugathan sir.He talk us about the history of thattekkad.In 1933-s  Salim Ali visit this place and knew about its biodiversity.
Class was in the outside of doormitory.So we can see paradise fly catcher and Malabar grey horn bill on the branches of trees.
At night Jey sir lectured us on the jobs in the forest department.
                         Last day of the camp we went to see inter pretation centre.We also see Medicinal plants garden and some animals .
Concluding cerymony is inagurated by Sugathan sir. At last all of us got  tree saplings .       
                        ''We go to forest not merely to see wild animals.
                          Such journeys should be for imbibing the wild
                          and free feeling of wilderness''
   This quoting is absalutely correct in the view of our trip.

Travel

JALDAPARA WILDLIFE SANCTUARY-Where mother nature unfolds

Posted by DEEPJYOTI on November 25, 2011

 
Forum Post
welcome!!
ENTRANCE TO JALDAPRA W.S

Thursday, 24 November 2011

Where it all begun

My trip to jaldapara wildlife sanctuary was debut in forest and wildlife tours. And it was certainly the one I would remember for years to come. We took the best way possible to reach JWS through train. We went to NEW JALPAIGURU from where we took the train to MADARIHAT, a small village that serves as the gateway to JWS. One can even opt for other routes as their are various via roads and rails.


By noon we reached MADARIHAT and a car picked us up and went to HOLLONG FOREST LODGE inside the JWS core forest area. The tourist lodge is rarely available and it is to be booked atleast a 120 days before to reserve it. But people can opt for other hotels also that is present in MADARIHAT.
After a delicios lunch we got ready for our evening forest safari in a jeep.

Our first destination was HARINDANGA WATCH TOWER. From the watch tower there is a beautiful view of the spanning forest. But to our luck we couldn't spot any animals from there. Disappointed we left and continued out ride to JALDAPARA WATCH TOWER.

En route to their quiet a lot peacocks and peahens can be sighted moving around along the road. Keeping our eyes open we moved on and got our rewards when we spotted a herd of GAUR. Indian wild buffaloes , bigger in size to their african counter part. The gaurs are mainly black in color with milky white coverings from their knees to hoof and their big horns. Looked like they were wearing caps and sock. Moving in herd it was quiet a bit far from our jeep still we managed a good glimpse.
Finally we arrived at jaldapara watch tower from which a good view of barking deer nibbling in the field could be seen. Timid and shy creature it is and any movement made by us alerted it as a result always kept a safe distance from the watch tower.
Finally it was dark a bit at dusk and we started off for HOLLONG. Our final resting place for the night. A stay at hollong for the night is as good as the safari as the natives of the forest come together in the front view of the lodge deep at night. Salt pits are put to feed the animals which are in requirement for animals to in take minerals. These attract the animals at the night and they are visible from the windows of the room. A great night to be experienced.
 At dawn try to avail the first of the elephant trips to get more chances of viewing the animals. We did so and got lucky. KUNKI meaning female tamed elephants take four at once to visit inside the green. It is a ride to remember cause it gets you up-close and personal with the forest. The tension and excitement is captured best on the ride.

The ride takes you to true core forest area where sometimes the light does not enter. The leafs of the plants and its other parts often touch you and feels like serpent crawling on you. After a while we reached the grassland where mother nature revealed its secret and we were blessed to see the ONE HORNED RHINOCEROS native to INDIA. Elephants get you as close as 10 yards to them as rhinos are generally well behaved animals provided you don't agitate them.
An average of 2 - 3 rhinos are visible to every tourist, far less than KAZIRANGA in ASSAM though. It is due to the total size of JWS is one-eighth of the kaziranga. Moving ahead with our trip we caught a glance of SAMBAR, big and strong hervivores. Presence of those animal proved that bengal tiger is also available but rarest to be spotted.

We were content to find the diverse variety of flora and fauna and my jungle experience was really great. I promised I shall return in the green soon. And most luckily mother nature rewarded us with the icing on the cake. From a 50 yards out we could spot a animal which is so popular to us, the most successful of  all killer cats. THE INDIAN LEOPARD. Resting and tanning its skin in the morning sun it rested on the ground.
And after sometimes it started having its breakfast from a kill it had last night. That was the probability, as said by our mahut. But we continued to click pictures of it from a good distance as time came to halt. It was a lifetime view.

After the wonderful , once in a light year jungle ride we were back at our HOLLONG and at noon we bid adieu to the JWS catching train back to NJP via madarihat.

 
I enjoyed being in mother nature's lap and now i frequently visit. You should too. It wont dishearten you if you keep faith in her. Run to her as soon as possible. :)



Corporates and Environment

Himalyan watershed Project

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 31, 2011

 
Forum Post
The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has registered the Himachal Pradesh Mid-Himalayan Watershed Project for carbon credits.

The Himalayan Watershed Project will thus accrue millions of carbon credits which will benefit about 5,000 families from remote and backward villages in the state, receiving revenue for the next 20 years from the World Bank for providing green cover to 4,000 hectare barren land area falling in 10 districts.

"The project is estimated to generate carbon revenue of at least Rs 20 crore to the communities and individual land holders for the first crediting period of 20 years, which is a strong incentive to protect forest cover," RK Kapoor, Chief Project Director of the programme, said.

This is the first experiment of its kind in getting participation of local people in the conservation and protection of environment. The villagers will be paid 90 per cent of the revenue the state government gets by selling to the World Bank the carbon credits resulting from sequestration of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide through afforestation.


Read full report at the link

http://www.igovernment.in/



Share this page:

Join Us    

Download IWC Android app     IWC Android app



Copyright © 2001 - 2021 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use

Website developed and managed by Alok Kaushik