Bio-Diversity

A victory for banning Endosulfan!

Posted by Susan Sharma on July 28, 2011

 
Forum Post
An accidental discovery by a farmer that red ants could replace the use of pesticide to contain the attack of tea mosquito bugs in cashew plants, has prompted the Kerala Government to refine the ant technolgy for larger field application. 
Entomolgy department of the Kerala Agricultural University in Kasargode has begun a three year project on the use of red ants in vegetable cultivation to do away with the use of pesticides to curb the insects. 
N. Vasavan, a small-scale farmer in the district, had brought back the ant- based biological pest control in his cashew plantation when the farm sector was heavily banking on pesticides.

Read more at

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/Kerala-farmer-uses-red-ants-to-fight-cashew-bugs/823890/

Bio-Diversity

BEEJ BACHAO ANDOLAN

Posted by Tulip Das on February 04, 2011

 
Forum Post

The ‘Beej Bachao Andolan’ [BBA], begun in the late 1980s, is twenty five year old, led by farmer and social activist Vijay Jardhari. The Andolan started in the village Jardhargaon of district Tehri, Uttaranchal, famous for its unique movement to save the traditional seeds of the hills.

 

The ‘Beej Bachao Andolan’ [Save the Seed Movement or BBA] is not only a crusade to conserve traditional seeds but also to promote agriculture and local tradition.

 

A farmer and social activist, Vijay Jardhari realized that modern agriculture was destroying traditional farming. Crop yields of the high-yielding varieties in the modern agriculture were actually low; soil fertility was declining leading to an increasing dependence on toxic chemicals. Along with other activities of chipco movement, Jardhari formed the BBA to promote traditional agriculture and crop varieties.

 

In the valley of Ramasirain, Uttarkashi district, Farmers were growing a distinctive variety of red rice called chardhan. The rice was nutritious and suited to local requirements and conditions. Farmers also grew indigenous varieties like thapchini, jhumkiya, rikhwa and lal basmati. Agriculture here was untouched by modern practices and good yields were obtained without the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. What the farmers here were doing was avoiding monoculture in a method called baranaja [12 grains] that involves the multicropping of a no. Of cereals and legumes. This diversification is security against drought and crop failure. Different crops are harvested at different times of the year and ensure year-round supply of food. This also maintain soil fertility replenishes nitrogen.

 

Today BBA has about 150 varieties of paddy from which 100 different varieties can still be grown. BBA has also collected 170 varieties of rajma. Effective pest control is accomplished by using the leaves of the walnut and neem, and the application of the ash and cow’s urine. The use of traditional farming methods and seeds has resulted higher yields, improved health of humans and increased conservation of soil fertility and agro-biodiversity.

Bio-Diversity

Vulture consrvation

Posted by Dr. Dau Lal Bohra on November 02, 2010

 
Forum Post
Activities to save the vulture's,Jorbeer, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Populations of three Vulture species, White-rumped Vulture (Gyps bengalensis), Slender-billed Vulture (Gyps tenuirostris) and the Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus)have suffered large decreases across the wold. Poisoningthrough consumption of carcasses that have previously been treated withthe veterinary drug Diclofenac has led to large population declines.The main threat to vultures in India  is diclo,since numbers of largewild ungulate species that constitute the mainsource of food forvultures are relatively low. A vulture restaurant isthe provision of adomestic animal carcass (a cow is the most usualspecies) to vultures atan appropriate site within their range.

Alternative feeding management of Gyps Vulture for migratory species in North West Rajasthan, India
(Vulture Safe Zones – Vulture Restaurants)

Necessary to conserve vulture’s migratory root


Currenttime focus on vulture conservation in North West Rajasthan especiallyBikaner region is very important. This is very sensitive area regardingto bird conservation, but in governmental policy focusing only suchsite their vulture population took place all the year example- nearNational park, wild life conservation area and other places. Butregarding the vulture migration is also the very big problem formonitoring and conservation aspects. South Asia is very important areafor vulture migration, so alternative feeding management is necessaryfor rest Gyps vulture’s and their conservation. In year 1999 to 2009,lot of Rs utilized for vulture conservation by Government and NGO’sbody, but in last 10 year no big changes for vulture population andtheir relevant area.

Importance of Alternative feeding management
Manyscientists suggest for decline of vulture population to change climaticand behavioral mode including roosting and feeding site. But reallyfood changing is the major factor for decline, So Alternative feedingmanagement system is very helpful for regarding conservation. Manytheories given by research paper but in ground level this is the notpossible and it’s very costly. So presenting this particular mode offeeding management is helpful for protection.

Treats of feeding managements

Vultureshave performed important ecological, traditional and aestheticfunctions throughout the Indian subcontinent.  In Vulture conservationprogram Indian government make up very sensitive and important issuebut in ground level they were worked not properly as If VeterinaryDiclofenac Ban by Government they people were used unspecified brand orHuman Diclofenac (Generic) for animal treatment. In many places poisonsuse for dead animal protection from vultures or carnivorous birdsspecies but they poison work against for environment. In Present timegovernment made many protocol for vulture conservation specially policyto recover the particular 3 endangered species but although mean timeIndian Griffon is also reduced in number. If don’t take any action bygovernment or NGO’s they show same scenario as OWBV’s position, soneeded to change protocol for migratory vultures program from allworking agencies. Historically, many factors have been responsible forlocal vulture declines particularly poisoning and persecution. Thedeclines in India result from elevated adult and juvenile mortality,and low breeding success. The widespread and rapid pattern of declines,i.e. in all areas irrespective of habitat or protection status suggestthat persecution through shooting or poisoning, whilst important at alocal scale, are unlikely to have caused the declines.  Theepidemiology of the declines is best explained by the introduction andwidespread use (i.e. nationwide) of a contaminant, or an infectiousdisease.

Available safe meat for vultures (activities to save the vulture in the Jorbeer, Bikaner)
Providing the safe meat (diclofenac and other poison’s free animal)for vulture feeding as alternative method for migratory species. Theyprefer which animals from the areas where dairy farmers usually avoiddiclofenac their large cattle and utilize Meloxicam or other painkillerof treatment.

Other activity
1.    Provide Diclofenac-free food to vultures in a secure and undisturbed location.
2.   Create awareness among local inhabitants about the need to conservevultures through publications and          education programmes.
3.    Work with veterinarians to prevent the use and diversion of human Diclofenac for treatment of cattle.
4.    Regular vulture census in the region.

Bio-Diversity

Stopping a Mass Extinction

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on October 07, 2010

 
Forum Post
......We, Homo sapiens, are an inextricable part of this complex web of life. It’s both presumptuous and silly to ask what biodiversity does for us—a little like asking what the rest of the body and organs do for the bones...............

We don’t, and never will, actually understand all the intricacies of this complex web. Rigorous scientific research has given us many insights, among the most powerful being that the more biodiverse a system, the more stable it is. .........

Read the whole article at
http://www.livemint.com/2010/10/06222637/Stopping-a-mass-extinction.html

Bio-Diversity

Weapons of Mass Destruction

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 02, 2008

 
Forum Post

"Such is the lack of information about the biodiversity of Arunachal Pradesh that the Arunachal Macaque (Macaca munzala) - a species of monkey already known to the native people of Arunachal (especially to the Monpas of Tawang and the tribes of the West Kameng District) as Munzala or the “monkey of the deep forest”, remained unknown to scientists and biologists till it was “discovered” in 2004. The so called “discovery” was waiting to happen and it was after more than a hundred years that a new species of macaque was discovered (the last recent discovery being the Indonesian Pagai Island Macaque in 1903)."

 

Indian Wild Life Club 

Arunachal Macaque in Tawang (Photo:Govind Singh)

 

Source: http://www.indianwildlifeclub.com/ezine/index.asp?m=5&y=2008

Bio-Diversity

Man and the Biosphere

Posted by Susan Sharma on February 15, 2008

 
Forum Post

Man and the Biosphere

According to a recent declaration adopted by UNESCO’s ‘Third World Congress of Biosphere Reserves’, it underscores potential for action of biosphere reserves to address new challenges such as the loss of traditional knowledge and cultural diversity, demography, loss of arable land and climate change.

--------------
It also urges the development of cooperation between the Man and the Biosphere (MAB) programme and UNESCO’s other intergovernmental scientific programmes.

Meanwhile, in the meeting, the members also adopted the Madrid Action Plan, mapping out the MAB programme’s strategy for 2008-2013.

-------------

The Action Plan called for concrete activities, which include facilitating integration of urban areas of the reserves, organising training related to the different ecosystems, establishing pilot reserves in order to evaluate their economic contribution at local level, involving the private sector and promoting the biosphere reserve brand for products.

Source:  http://www.igovernment.in/site/biosphere-reserves-can-mitigate-climate-change-un/

 

Bio-Diversity

Gene tweaked but is this brinjal safe to eat?

Posted by Susan Sharma on February 01, 2008

 
Forum Post

Gene tweaked but is this brinjal safe to eat?

Bio-Diversity

Rainforest -A Christmas Song

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 27, 2007

 
Forum Post
Watch a poignant short clip on "Silent Night", the most popular Christmas Song of all times, at the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQFWEc7I_jk

Bio-Diversity

Bio diversity and oceans

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 06, 2007

 
Forum Post


“Seventy percent of the world is ocean and eighty percent of global biodiversity is in it. We need to take care of the ocean. No matter where we are, we depend on it.”
–Wallace J. Nichols

 
Wallace J. Nichols does much of his turtle research in Baja California, Mexico.

For at least 150 million years, sea turtles have roamed the Earth’s oceans. This makes them at least 858 times older than the first Homo sapiens. Survivors of the mass extinction that wiped dinosaurs out, enduring lengthy travels along the sea and fighting heavy predation that results in survival statistics of about one in a thousand, they have managed to stay around. That is, until now. Out of the seven species of marine turtles in the world, six feature as endangered or critically endangered in the Red List of Threatened Species, a list compiled by the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) and updated every year with the best available scientific information. Humans bear direct responsibility.

Source: http://www.emagazine.com/view/?3987

 

Bio-Diversity

National Parks

Posted by Susan Sharma on November 18, 2007

 
Forum Post

National Parks

National Parks around the world need to get more media space than they get today. These Parks hold the key to the future of mankind- with rare species of animals, birds, plants and aquatic life waiting to be explored.

India has 85 National Parks and 450 wildlife sanctuaries.

Share this page:
Page 3 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6

Join Us    

Download IWC Android app     IWC Android app



Copyright © 2001 - 2021 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use

Website developed and managed by Alok Kaushik